Cyriac-FHP

Y-DNA Patrilineal Ancestry - 3k+ spellings - 2k year history

About us

Cyriac Family History Project
GOALS - Presumed Branches not yet connected to the Main Family Tree Bloodline

Ciriaci of Italy:  Until we prove they are the same ancient family, the Ciriaci and Cyriaci (and whatever other close spellings either of them have beginning with the 'Ci...' or 'Cy...') will be kept separate.  That should help avoid confusion building family trees for either of those most ancient Rome area surnames which were most likely joined as alternative spellings at some time in the 4th century era.

Ciriack of New England & Germany:  We have a family tree going back to 1798 that was constructed by Ben Ciriacks in 1973 during his 60 day Greyhound Bus trip though out the USA.  That trip included stays in New England to meet various Ciriacks family members.  This branch of the family was discovered when Ben found Ralph Ciriack in the Phoenix, Arizona telephone book while on Spring Break (1971) from the U. of New Mexico and 'cold called' Ralph to set up a meeting and subsequent friendship.  Ralph's grandson, also named Ralph, had recently died from a drug overdose after returning from Vietnam military service - he was the last male CIRIACK in their family.  Ralph thought his name was going to die out until he and Ben Ciriacks met.  Ralph was also ex-Navy and had been a Top Chef in New York City hotels until retiring to Sun City.  His new neighbors couldn't wait for the next neighborhood dinner gathering while he was around.  Ralph eventually joined his son at his homestead in Azle, Texas and was visited there by Ben and John Ciriacks during another Spring Break trip (from Ben's studies at the U. of Wisconsin-Madison) in 1972.

Ciriaco of Italy:

Ciriaco of Spain
 Ciriaco of Spain: Mid-3rd century (saint) Lawrence of Rome was from Spain.
 He was intimately connected to the Cyriac family and was most likely a
 relative.  The Ciriaco spelling should have sprung up in Spain around this
 era if this is all true.

Cyr of France & elsewhere:
Cyr of France & elsewhere:  This very abbreviated spelling appears to be in
 honor of and related to the child martyr killed in the area of Mediterranean
 where the present borders of Turkey, Syria and Lebanon meet.  His legend and
 name may have been promoted by French Crusaders.

Cyriac of India:

Cyriac of England & elsewhere:

Cyriaci of Italy:
  Until we prove they are the same ancient family, the Ciriaci and Cyriaci (and whatever other close spellings either of them have beginning with the 'Ci...' or 'Cy...') will be kept separate.  That should help avoid confusion building family trees for either of those most ancient Rome area surnames which were most likely joined as alternative spellings at some time in the 4th century era.

Cyriackes of London, England: (See the 'Results' page for this branch of the family that migrated from the Bremen, Germany area in the 18th century.)

Cyriacks of Bremen, Germany:    We have 16 generations of patrilineal ancestry going back to 1537, including four current PRIVATE generations.
  The Ciriac, Ciriack, Ciriacks, Cyriacks, Cyriacs, Cyriaks, and most likely every other similar spelling in the Bremen metropolitan area are undoubtedly all related to each other through ancestors who migrated to the area in the early 16th century.  We already have at least three distinct family trees going back to the 16th century and could build others thanks to the efforts of family members in the area who have recently placed their findings online at the Die Maus web site.  

  Needless to say, this is the largest, most comprehensive family tree we have for our extended world wide family.  Much of it is organized on Ben Ciriacks hard drive by using the Windows Explorer folder scheme to represent each generation of family members.

Cyriacus of Germany:            .. gen back to 154y (earliest = 1402)

Cyriaks of non-Bremen, Germany:   A 3 generation family tree for Christian Jurgen Cyriaks (Zierjacks) of the Mecklenburg-Schwerin area of northeast Germany was prepared in 1973 from records obtained from the LDS library in Salt Lake City - their archived records were prepared by Clara C. B. Matthias.

Cyriakus of southern Germany:

Cyriaque of Africa:

Cyriaque of Louisiana:

Cyriax of Africa & Germany:   This is presumed to be the most ancient, possibly 4th century, migrants to Germany - presumably from Italy and other Mediterranean areas coincident with the Final Great Persecution of Christians by Diocletian in the early 4th century as his parting gift to his successors. Ben Ciriacks believes that the 'X' represented the greek Chi (hard K sound) and was purposely placed at the end instead of 'CUS' or 'CS' or 'CKS' in order to identify the family members as CHRISTIANS - Original Christians or those who participated in and helped preserve Christianity from destruction at the hands of the pagan Romans. Those showing up with this spelling are also the ones with the highest level of education - indicating wealth, stability and dedication - just the type of people who would be among the 'movers and shakers' of any governmental system.
 
Cyriax of Egypt, England, Germany & USA:
These are the highly educated individuals who migrated to England and thence to the USA, Egypt and elsewhere from the Gotha/Erfurtarea of Germany.  Orthopedic Doctor James Henry Cyriax was one of the more prominent members of this family in England and did extensive family history research on his own.  (See the narratives accompanying various 'Photos' associated with this spelling for more information.)

 May 31, 1971 (genealogist letter):

   "I had a phonecall here in Hamburg with a Carl Cyriax, his family came from Gotha/Thuringia. ..." 

 The Cyriax family tree goes back to 1680 and does not include the current PRIVATE individuals.

Kyriacou of Greece:

Kyriakos of Middle East:

Kyriakou of Greece: 
 This large family is already represented at Family Tree DNA but time has not yet been found to investigate it much - other than the fact that the sample of individuals tested so far does not closely match the Y-DNA111 results for Ben Ciriacks.

Sierichs of Bremen, Germany:
 The Y-DNA111 results of the first male tested should prove that what Ben Ciriacks suspects is true - this spelling is one of the first close but not obvious variations in the spelling of the family surname in the Bremen area.

Zirjacks of Texas: Letters from our professional genealogist in Germany have these tidbits of information:

 March 21, 1971:

   "... there are Zilliacus appearing in the old records of Hamburg churches in 1805, 102 (sic) and 1814 ..."

 May 31, 1971 (genealogist letter):

   "I had a phonecall here in Hamburg with a Carl Cyriax, his family came from Gotha/Thuringia. ..."

   "... phoned with a Paul Zieriacks whos family came in the 17.century from Zarrentin/Mecklenburg.  He has relatives in Mexico and was very interested in the familyhistory. ..."

 (see Cyriaks of non-Bremen, Germany)

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