BREWERTON

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About us

One member of the Welsh subgroup has the following Haplogroup.

R1b1a2 (R-M269) He is now classified as R-PF7589. As new snps are developed these will change.

R1b1a2 (2011 name) is defined by the presence of SNP marker M269. European R1b is dominated by R-M269. It has been found at generally low frequencies throughout central Eurasia  but with relatively high frequency among Bashkirs of thePerm Region (84.0%)

This marker is also present in China and India at frequencies of less than one percent.

The frequency is about 70 % in Spain and 60 % in France.  In south-eastern England the frequency of this clade is about 70%;  in parts of the rest of north and western England, Spain, Portugal, Wales and Ireland, it is as high as 90%; and in parts of north-western Ireland it reaches 98%. It is also found in North Africa, where its frequency surpasses 10% in some parts of Algeria.  It has been reported in newspapers that King Tut is a member of the haplogroup R1b1a2, but it is found in less than 1 % of men in most parts of Egypt today

From 2003 to 2005 what is now R1b1a2 was designated R1b3. From 2005 to 2008 it was R1b1c. From 2008 to 2011 it was R1b1b2.

I2b1.

A member of the Brewerton/Broughton sub group is I2b1. It has been difficult to find information on this group though Google leads to a forum on Rootsweb. It is thought to be represented in Scandinavia and particularly in Denmark


Genealogical Terms.

The Y Chromosome is unique to men. Made of coils upon coils of DNA, it is the only chromosome passed to the next generation without being hopelessly splice-mixed with the spouses chromosomes; hence Male Y chromosome tests are used to trace surname lines.

DNA means Deoxyribonucleic Acid, an organic chemistry term for the spiral ladder molecule containing our genetic code.

Genetic Code is held in ladder rungs made of complementary coupled pairs of amino acids. When the coupling splits open, the revealed sequence of amino acids is our genetic code.

Amino Acids: Adenine (A) couples with thymine (T). Guanine (G) couples with Cytosine (C). This results in ladder rungs of T-A, A-T, G-C, or C-G. Rarely the wrong amino acid pair is copied into position. This type of mutation is called an SNP.

SNP means "Single Nucleotide Polymorphism", being exceedingly rare they are useful in tracing genetic branches of the human tree back 10s of thousands of years ago. SNPs can be tested to discover your Haplogroup.

Haplogroups are people with common long-term genetics. They sit on the same branch of the human tree.

Haplotype is the term used for any individual's unique sequence of STR markers, akin to a final twig or leaf on the tree.

STR stands for "Short Tandem Repeat". The Y chromosome has a lot of nonsense DNA, including hundreds of places where the code repeats itself as in, GATAGATAGATAGATA etc. About once in 500 generations the number of repeats increases or decreases. This is far more frequent than SNP mutations, making STRs useful in genealogy. DNA tests count and report these repeats at up to 67 different DYS Markers. Testing 67 markers brings the total odds of a mutation in each generation to about 14%.

DYS Marker stands for D-NA of the Y- chromosome in S-hort tandem repeats. Each marker is numerically identified such as DYS 439 so as to know which STRs were counted. The more DYS Marker counts you match to another individual, the higher the probability of a recent common ancestor.

MRCA is the acronym for Most Recent Common Ancestor. TMRCA is Time back to the Most Recent Common ancestor. This time is given in years or generations

 

 

 








Eurasia,[21] but with relatively high frequency among Bashkirs of the Perm Region (84.0%).[3] This marker is also present in China and India at frequencies of less than one percent. The table below lists in more detail the frequencies of M269 in various regions in Asia, Europe, and Africa.Spain and 60 % in France.[25] In south-eastern England the frequency of this clade is about 70%;[25] in parts of the rest of north and western England, Spain, Portugal, Wales and Ireland, it is as high as 90%; and in parts of north-western Ireland it reaches 98%. It is also found in North Africa, where its frequency surpasses 10% in some parts of Algeria.[26] It has been reported in newspapers that King Tut is a member of the haplogroup R1b1a2, but it is found in less than 1 % of men in most parts of Egypt today.[25]