Slaton Slatten Slayden Y-DNA

Family Research of male lines for all variations of the surname.
  • 91 members

About us

Begun in in the late 1980s by Clinton Slayton, a newsletter project expanded to 50 members by the late 1990s. DNA was investigated as a tool, but one (forrmer) member of the project published a "single origin" theory separately from the project's aegis, which muddies the waters of family research even after YDNA results show this to be more than a single male source. When Ancestry abandoned YDNA, MyFamily sites and RootsWeb, the three main elements of the project were affected: 1) DNA Project grid, 2) a private social site for sharing images and citations to documentary finds, and 3) posted GEDCOMs on RootsWeb WorldConnect, which are now garbled since 2017. A lot of work and contacts have been lost or remain online but difficult to interpret since Nov 2017, when GEDCOMS on RootsWeb lost their legible formats.

We found a replacement home for MyFamily on SPOKT.com. Most of the Ancestry YDNA was transferred to Family TreeDNA, but not all, because of financial considerations and the inaccessibility of some members, some of whom are deceased. The non-transferred members are identical to groupings here, and would show a larger "pool" of matches visually if transferred. Since they were tested by Sorenson/Relative Genetics/Ancestry, they cannot participate in FTDNA's haplotype predictor or "Matching" protocols.

All direct male descendants of a suspected Slaton or Slatten heritage, regardless of adoption of other surnames, are welcome to have results joined here. Since the site grid does not display full names, the data you enter for the oldest suspected (Most Distant) ancestor is quite important and required for membership unless the oldest ancestor is still living and you have no permission to do so.

 YDNA can either help to place a male within a contextual pool of cousins, or create or deepen a mystery regarding a lineage. Do not assume that information shown on "Trees" on the Internet, including "citations", is valid. False citations are prevalent in postings from a certain individual showing non-existent birth and marriage records. DNA does not lie (so far) but might upset a traditional genealogy. Sourced documentary research with standards based on such literature as Blaine Bettinger, Milton Rubincam and Eugene A Stratton can be bolstered or questioned  with "deep" connection results from YDNA. Neither DNA results or traditional genealogy can substitute for each other; both tools are equally important in reconstructing a plausible family history.  

This Project makes it fairly clear that some "trees" on FamilySearch, Ancestry, and WikiTree, Geni, etc., showing common male ancestors for all of the men found in 1711 Virginia and 1771 North Carolina leading back to a single man named John, and John leading back to English parents, are unresearched patching together of both real and completely fictitious family groupings.   

If you know or suspect descendancy from Thomas & Hannah Slaton/Slayton of Massachusetts, we would like to expand that pool of results. That line has also been connected to English ancestors on some trees with no strong proving documentation.

Any surname variant carrier is welcome even if unsure of descendancy. 

Any current sampler who has not expanded to Big Y is encouraged to do so, and in some cases, the Project might be able to underwrite some or all of the cost.

If this is unclear to you, contact Clinton at cslayton19@windstream.net or Wesley Miller at wamiller1313@gmail .com before asking to JOIN.

Members might be asked by the admin to join selected projects, such as Haplogroup Projects, with Privacy settings such that Most Distant Paternal Ancestor Name is not blocked. Please look at the existing grid for hints as to how to name your Most Distant Ancestor, these should be consistent. We might ask members to alter these for a consistent presentation. We request that any member will grant the Administrators ADVANCED access to their results to enable our research, but this is not a requirement

DISCLAIMER: 

Your Genetic Information is unique to you and your knowledge of it is irrevocable once revealed. You should not assume that any information provided to you will be welcome or positive. You should understand that you may learn information about yourself that you do not anticipate. This information may evoke strong emotions and has the potential to alter your life and worldview. You may discover things that are disconcerting and that you might not have the ability to control or change.