Madden

  • 134 members

About us

This project was started on February 4th, 2006.

Updated 21 March 2013; updated 6 May 2013; updated 18 November 2013; updated 24 November 2013; updated 2 March 2014;updated 28 June 2014; updated 8 January 2015; updated 18 May 2015; 28 December 2015; 14 May 2016; 21 August 2016, 17 March 2017, 27 November 2017, 14 July 2018, 16 July 2018, 22 July 2018, 13 June 2019, 14 June 2020, and 18 April 2022.

The surname Madden, and variants,such as Madigan (both being anglicized forms of the Gaelic Ó Madadhán), may have multiple origins. The theory has often been proposed that tenants of medieval Gaelic chiefs – and thus members of the tuath or pobble (meaning “lordship” or “people”: those who were subordinates or, possibly, affiliates of the ruling dynasty) may have adopted the surname of their overlords – the clan (from Gaelic clann, meaning “family”) that governed the tuath. Little is known about the frequency or patterns of such adoption.  What is certain, however, is that the Gaelic family that originally used the surname Ó Madadhán (which translates as “descendant of Madadhán”) were hereditary chiefs of Síol Anmchadha (otherwise anglicized Silanchia). It is also certain that their employment of Ó Madadhán as a hereditary surname cannot predate the Madadhán who is their titular ancestor.

There is some dispute whether the titular ancestor in question was the Madadhán, third Chief of Síol Anmchadha/Silanchia, who died in 1008 CE, or his nephew, Madadhán, son of Gadhra Mór, who died in 1048 CE. For our purposes, however, it matters little which of these was the Madadhán from which “the descendants of Madadhán” (i.e.the Uí Madadháin/Uí Maidín/Maddens/Madigans) took their name – either way, the surname has been used in Ireland for no more than 1,000 years. (It may help clarify this if we estimate the number of generations this represents. If we posit an average of 25 to 30 years per generation, the surname – in one form or another – has been in existence in Ireland for between 33 and 40 generations.)

In the context of this project – the Madden Surname Project – the aim is to subgroup members of the project within a meaningful genealogical time-frame – that is, to subgroup those members who, on the basis of their STR results, have been calculated to descend from a patrilinear ancestor within the period in which the Madden surname and its cognates (e.g. Madigan/Ó Maidín/Ó Madadhán) have existed.  

In the following, project members are grouped because they match on STR markers – as determined by FTDNATiP.  It may be noted that FTDNATiP calculates the probability to be less than a fifthof one percent (at 0.12%) that all those who are presently project members shared a common patrilinear ancestor (MRCA) within the last 24 generations. A calculation that is complemented by SNP markers (see below), which indicates that the most recent ancestor common to all present members lived in excess of three thousand years ago (i.e. more than 2000 years before the development of the Madden and Madigan surnames).

It should be noted that the following divisions into subgroups is in no way intended to be a commentary on which project members do or do not descend from the Maddens who were chiefs of Síol Anmchadha. None of the current project members have indicated that they have documentary evidence of descent from Madadhán. However, it is one of the aims of this project to have one or more individuals who have such genealogical evidence of descent from the Maddens of Silanchia join the project. It is hoped that the participation of such individuals will assist our present members in overcoming the otherwise insurmountable “brick wall” with which they are currently confronted in the absence of genealogical material relating to their families. The subgrouping that follows is intended to be the first step in this effort to complement documentary and genetic genealogy.

There are, at present, three groups,which are for the present designated MADDEN GROUP A, MADDEN Group B, possible GROUP C, MADDEN possible GROUP D, MADDEN possible group E, and MADIGAN GROUP F.These are the only groups presently discernible by FTDNATiP.

At present, those project members confirmed to be members of MADDEN GROUP A (the group also, at present, includes a provisional member) are within Genetic Distance (GD) of 6 of one another over 67 markers. FTDNATiP calculates the probability that these individuals share a common patrilinear ancestor within 24 generations (or about 700 years before the present) to be in excess of 95%.

Those project members constituting MADIGAN GROUP D may be so collected because one of the three acts as an intermediary or“bridge” linking the others in this group. Upgrading to a higher number of markers should facilitate analysis: all members of this subgroup upgrading to either 67 or 111 markers would enable the TMRCA (time to most recent common ancestor) to be predicted with more accuracy than is possible at present. The FTDNATiP evidence that these three Madigans share a common ancestor within a meaningful genealogical time-frame is strongly supported by the fact that one is confirmed to be haplogroup I21a, which is relatively rare in Irish populations. Thus, these three individuals match on a rare surname and a rare haplogroup, and they also appear to match on the basis of FTDNATiP analysis of their Y-DNA STR markers.

Some males who do not carry the Madden surname or that of known cognates have chosen to join the project. These individuals may well have Madden ancestry, and on that basis their interest (but without inclusion of their own Y-DNA results) in this project is very welcome. Since there is no reason to suppose that they carry Madden Y-DNA, it would be inappropriate to compare their Y-DNA results with those males who are surnamed Madden (or Madigan), and therefore they will not be analyzed within the Madden surname DNA project. People with Madden ancestry, but who are not themselves male Maddens, are encouraged to seek samples from male Madden relatives for inclusion in this project.

The following analysis subgroups as matches only those that are accepted as such by FTDNA. However, it should be borne in mind that the existence of just four groups is likely to represent sampling bias, and that those members who are presently ungrouped may, at some time in the future, form additional groups within the project should they match either new participants or, indeed, present participants who upgrade to 37 or more markers.

 


MADDEN GROUP A

(kit #55945, kit # 168525,kit #209439, kit #212392, kit #371117, kit #405784,kit #536168, kit#371049, kit #661298, kit #212090, kit#854924, kit #853454, and kit #88123)

This group provisionally includes kit#61575.This provisional inclusion is the result of this member, who has tested to 12 markers only, matching kit #55945 at GD of 0 over 12 markers (he is GD of 1 over 12 markers from each of kits #212392, #209439, and #168525). However, it should be noted that this member’s inclusion in GROUP A is provisional, and that upgrading to 37 or more markers is necessary in order to confirm his status.

This group is predicted to be haplogroup R1b-L21 (R1b1a2a1a2c), all members of this group who have tested to 67 markers are members of the FTDNAR-L21 Plus Project and the FTDNA R-Z253 Project, and are designated by both as“confirmed Z253+.” The earliest known ancestors declared by its members were born in counties Cork, Clare, and Galway.

Analyzed over 67 markers, FTDNATiP calculates at 81.56% the probability that this group consisting of kit numbers 55945, 168525, 209439,212392, 371117, 405784, 536168, 371049, 661298,212090, 854924, and 853454 share a common patrilinear ancestor within 18 generations, at 88.49% that they share a common patrilinear ancestor within 20 generations, and 95.98% that they share a common patrilinear ancestor within 24 generations (i.e., positing 30 years per generation, greater than 80% probability of a MRCA ancestor within the last 540 years or so; 90% of a MRCA within 600 years or so; and 95.98% of a MRCA within 720 years or so).

To this kit #88123 has been tentatively added, on the grounds that FTDNATiP comparison with pre-existing members furnishes the following: Showing GD 8 over 67 markers, the probability that 88123 and 212090 shared a common ancestor within the last 17 generations is 83.23%; in the last 18 generations is 87.02%; in the last 19 generations is 90.07%, and in the last 24 generations is 97.76%. Showing GD 9 over 67 markers, the probability that 88123 and 168525 shared a common ancestor within the last 18 generations is 76.48%; in the last 19 generations is 81.12%; in the last 22 generations is 90.88%, and in the last 24 generations is 94.66%. Showing GD 11 over 67 markers, the probability that 88123 and 209439 shared a common ancestor within the last 18 generations is 74.94%; within the last 20 generations is 83.79%; within the last 23 generations is 92.23%, and within the last 24 generations is 94.03%. Showing GD 9 over 67 markers, the probability that 88123 and 371049 shared a common ancestor within the last 18 generations is 74.71%; in the last 20 generations is 83.61%, and in the last 24 generations is 93.94%. Showing GD 9 over 67 markers, the probability that 88123 and 371117 shared a common ancestor within the last 18 generations is 74.71%; in the last 20 generations is 83.61%, and in the last 24 generations is 93.94%. Showing GD 10 over 67 markers, the probability that 88123 and 536168 shared a common ancestor within the last 18 generations is 74.71%; within the last 20 generations is 83.61%; within the last 23 generations is 92.11%, and within the last 24 generations is 93.94%. Showing GD 9 over 67 markers, the probability that 88123 and 848439 - shared a common ancestor within the last 18 generations is 72.84%; in the last 20 generations is 82.09%; in the last 23 generations is 91.14%, and in the last 24 generations is 93.12%. Showing GD 12 over 67 markers, the probability that 88123 and 212392 shared a common ancestor within the last 22 generations is 81.93%, and within the last 24 generations is 88.38%. Showing GD 10 over 67 markers, the probability that 88123 and 55945 shared a common ancestor within the last 18 generations is 61.55%; within the last 20 generations is 72.97%; within the last 22 generations is 81.86%, and with the last 24 generations is 88.32%. Showing GD 11 over 67 markers, the probability that 88123 and 405784 shared a common ancestor within the last 18 generations is 61.84%; within the last 20 generations is 73.22%; within the last 22 generations is 82.07%, and within the last 24 generations is 88.48%. Showing GD 11 over 67 markers, the probability that 88123 and 661298 shared a common ancestor within the last 18 generations is 61.09%; within the last 20 generations is 72.55%; within the last 22 generations is 81.52%, and within the last 24 generations is 88.06%. Showing GD 11 over 67 markers, the probability that 88123 and 854924 shared a common ancestor within the last 24 generations is 81.80%. Showing GD 11 over 67 markers, the probability that 88123 and 853454 shared a common ancestor within the last 24 generations is 78.69%.

If kit #88123 is included in Group A, and positing 30 years per generation, the probability of all members of this group having a MRCA within 720 years or so – that is, that all members of Group have in common an agnatic ancestor who was born probably some time in the late twelfth or early thirteenth century – is 78.69%. 


The most distant known ancestor of kit #55945 is his great-grandfather, John Madden, who was born in county Clare, Ireland, c.1806/07, emigrated to the US, settled first in New York and later in Sangamon, Illinois; he died in 1887, aged 80, and is buried in Springfield, Illinois.

Kit #168525, is confirmed to be haplogroup R1b-L21 (which, being R1b1a2a1a2c, is downstream of R-M269), and is Z253+ (having tested Z253+ L21+ P66- P314.2- M37- M222- L96- L226- L193-L159.2- L144-Z2185-). This project member’s sixth-great-grandfather, Michael Madden, was born in Ahidulane, par. Island/South Ring, par. Templeomalus, in the barony of Ibane and Barryroe. He moved to the townland of Castlefreke Island in the parish of Rathbarry, in the same barony, and, in 1766, was head of the only household of Maddens in that parish. Of his sons, the younger, James, qualified as a forty-shilling freeholder in 1787 (and did so again in 1794 and 1796); the elder, Thomas (fourth-great-grandfather of kit #168525), qualified as a forty-shilling freeholder in 1796. This member represents a family that includes Jeremiah Madden (born 1803), chief officer, merchant service; John Madden (born 1818), chief officer, merchant service, and John Madden (born 1820), chief officer, merchant service.

John Madden, the fourth-great-grandfather of kit #209439, was born about 1745 in the parish of Lislee, barony of Ibane and Barryroe.  Kit #209439 is a descendant of James Maddin, gent, of the townland of Lislee, in the parish of Lislee, whose son, Ensign James Maddon, gent, of the barony of Ibane, served in David McWilliam Barry’s company of MacCartie Mór's regiment of King James II’s Irish Army. Both James Maddens were outlawed for foreign treason in 1696. The younger became one of those Irish Jacobites subsequently known as the “Wild Geese”; he married in Saint-Malo, Brittany, and settled in France. This member represents a family that includes Dennis Madden (born 1812), ship master; Daniel Madden (1838-88), chief officer, merchant service; Cornelius Madden (1838-84), chief officer, merchant service; Daniel Madden (1880-1923), chief officer, merchant navy; the Very Revd Jeremiah Finbarr Madden, B.A., B.D., D.Ph., O.S.A. (1910-80), variously, Vicar Provincial, St John's Priory, Dublin, Prior of the National Church of St Patrick and Rector of St Patrick’s College, Rome, and Superior of the Professorium at Ballyboden, Rathfarnham.

Documentary research positions both kit #168525 and kit #209439 as descendants of the Thomas Madden whose sons, Owen m‘Tho. Maddin and James fitz Tho. Maddin of the townland of Kilshinihan, parish of Kilbrittain, barony of Carbery East (East Division), county Cork, were among the followers of Dermod Moyle MacCarthy pardoned on 26 May 1601 for their involvement in the Nine Years War (1594-1603). (This supports FTDNATiP's calculation, over 67 markers, of 90.53% probability that these two kits share a common agnatic ancestor within the last 12 generations.) Among their ancestors are Morrough / Morrogh (these are anglicized forms of the Gaelic Murchadha, which is otherwise anglicized Morgan) o Maddin / Maddan who, in the early seventeenth century, held land in the townland of Kilbrogan, parish of same, in the barony of Kinelmeaky, and held several properties in the town of Bandonbridge (the only leaseholder in the town to bear a Gaelic surname, and from whom, James Maddin, who was burd Kilbrogan churchyard, 6 Jan. 1711; William Madden, inn-keeper, of Bandonbridge, burd Kilbrogan churchyard, 9 June 1723; Elizabeth Madden, burd Ballymodan churchyard, 31 May 1732; Jeremy Madden, burd Ballymodan, 31 Aug. 1732; Hammett Madden, burd Kilbrogan, 14 Nov. 1740; William Madden, burd Kilbrogan, 30 Nov. 1740, and John Madden, burd Kilbrogan 7 Jul. 1741); “Morgane o Madden of Richfordstowne [parish of Inniskenny, barony of Kinalea] in the said County [i.e. Cork] gentleman” who was in open rebellion in 1641, and "Donough Maddin" of Courceys barony (born c. 1612), who, on 13 September 1652, gave witness with respect to the killing of John Stepney, of Garrylucas (par. Ringrone, bar. Courceys), who had been attacked and killed in Garretstown (par. Templetrine, bar. Courceys) on 13 March 1641, and who, in 1679 (recorded as "Donough Maddy"), was prosecuted for illegal attachment of his creditors' goods within the liberties of Kinsale town.

Paul Madden, the fifth-great-grandfather of kit #212392, lived in the parishes of Kilbroney and Buttevant, barony of Orrery and Kilmore, county Cork, and died in 1782, aged 79. This member represents a family that includes Alderman Paul J. Madden (1839-1901), mayor of Cork, his daughter, the novelist Katherine Cecil Thurston (1875-1911); Owen Madden, J.P., P.L.G. (1790-1853); the Hon. Sir John Madden, LL.D., G.C.M.G. (1844-1918), Chief Justice and Lieutenant-Governor, Victoria; the Hon. Sir Francis Madden (1847-1921), Speaker of the Victorian Legislative Assembly and President of the Historical Society of Victoria; the Very Revd Morgan Madden (1811-1864), Parish Priest of Clonakilty and Vicar-General of the Diocese of Ross; the Very Revd Patrick Madden, (1828-1884), Parish Priest and Vicar Forane (i.e., Rural Dean) of Clonakilty; the Very Revd Samuel Owen Madden, M.A., D.D. (1831-1891), Rector of St Fin Barre's Parish and Dean of Cork, and Prebendary of Tymothan, St. Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin; the Very Revd Canon Michael Madden (1856-1923), Parish Priest of Charleville; the Revd Canon Owen Madden, M.A. (1871-1947), Rector of Castlehaven, Prebendary of Killanully, Chancellor of the Diocese of Cork, and Treasurer of the Diocese of Ross; Captain William Henry Madden (1885-1918), 10th (Service) Battalion Princess Victoria's (Royal Irish Rifles), who served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders from Oct. 1915, and was killed in action near St. Quentin; the novelist Mabel Sarah Madden; Samuel Fitzgerald Madden, C.I.E., O.B.E. (1878-1934), 2nd Lieut., 17th Bombay, Baroda and Central India Railway Battalion, and Principal of Mayo College, Ajmer, India; Daniel Owen Madden, B.L. (1815-1859), Barrister-at-Law, novelist, historian, biographer, and political commentator (who published as "Daniel Owen-Madden," "Daniel Owen Maddyn," and "Danby North"); and also, through his mother, Mary Madden, the Revd Prof. Morgan Madden Sheedy, LL.D. (1853-1939), historian and theologian; and,  through his mother, Ellen Madden, Denny M. Lane, M.A. (1818-1895), Barrister-at-Law,poet (publishing under the pseudonym “Domnall Na Glanna”), President of the Desmond Confederate Club, President of the Cork Literary and Scientific Society, and Vice-President of the Cork Historical and Archaeological Society.


Kit #37117 is R-BY19652+ (downstream of R1b-L21). The most distant known ancestor of kit #37117 is his third-great-grandfather, James Madden, of Knockballynameath townland in parish of St Patrick, in the barony of Bunratty Lower, Co. Clare, c.1795-c.1850. Over 67 markers, kit #37117 is GD of 2 from kits #55945 and #168525, GD of 5 from kit #209439, and GD of 6 from kit #212392. (FTDNATiP calculates the MRCA of #37117 and #55945 at 92.19 within 10 generations, 96.44% within 12 generations, 99.33 within 16 generations, and 99.96% within 24 generations; FTDNATiP calculates the MRCA of #37117 and #168525 at 91.95% within 12 generations, 96.49% within 14 generations, 99.04% within 17 generations, and 99.96% within 24 generations; FTDNATiP calculates the MRCA of #37117 and #209439 at 82.24% within 16 generations, 91.91% within 19 generations, 96.6 within 22 generations, and 98.16% within 24 generations; FTDNATiP calculates the MRCA of #37117 and #212392 at 92.05% within 22 generations, and 95.29% within 24 generations.)

The most distant known ancestor of kit #405784 is Patrick Madden, who was born circa 1854. Over 67 markers, kit #405784 is GD of 2 from kit #371117; GD of 4 from kits #55945 and #168525; GD of 7 from #209439, and GD of 8 from #212392. (FTDNATiP calculates the MRCA of#405784 and #371117 at 81.41% within 5 generations, 92.38% within 7 generations, and 99.31% within 12 generations; FTDNATiP calculates the MRCA of #405784 and #55945 at 59.78% within 5 generations, 90.17% within 9 generations, 95.60% within 11 generations, 99.22% within 15 generations, and 99.99% within 24 generations; FTDNATiP calculates the MRCA of #405784 and #168525 at 57.85% within 7 generations, at 81.85% within 10 generations, at 90.53% within 12 generations, at 95.30% within 14 generations, at 99.31% within 19 generations, and at 99.91% within 24 generations; FTDNATiP calculates the MRCA of #405784 and #209439 at 56.27% within 9 generations, at 91.03% within 15 generations, at 95.24% within 17 generations, at 99.16% within 22 generations, and at 99.60% within 24 generations; FTDNATiP calculates the MRCA of #405784 and #212392 at 91.89 within 18 generations, 95.52% within 20 generations, and 98.76% within 24 generations.)

Kit #371049

Kit #536168, the earliest known agnatic ancestor, John Madden, born 1848.

Kit #661298, the earliest known agnatic ancestor is Anthony Madden, who married in 1839.

Kit #212090

Kit #854924, the earliest known agnatic ancestor -- his second-great-grandfather, is Michael Paul Madden (born 1836 in Timicat, Kilkerrin, Galway; died 1901 in Sumter, McLeod, Minnesota, U.S.A.), the son of Patrick Madden (1802-79), This family lived in the townland of Timicat/Timacat, in the parish of Kilkerrin, in the barony of Tiaquin, county Galway.

Kit #853454, the earliest known agnatic ancestor is Michael Madden (1804-81).

Kit #848439, the earliest known agnatic ancestor is Martin Madden (1808-92).

Kit #88123 (tentative member of this group), the earliest known agnatic ancestor is Michael Madden (1820-89).

Kit #61575 has tested to 12 markers only. His only match at this level being GD of 0 from #55945. He is GD of 1 from each of kits#212392, #209439, #168525, and #N71477. This member is predicted to be haplogroup R-M269.  This member is, on the basis of his perfect match with #55945 over 12 markers, a provisional member of MADDEN GROUP A. Upgrading to 37 or more markers is necessary in order to confirm whether or not this kit belongs in this group.

With the exception of kit #88123, all members of this group who have tested to 67 markers are within a Genetic Distance (GD) of 6 of one another over 67 markers.

Over 67 markers, kit #55945 is GD of 4 from #168525; GD of 5 from #209439, and GD of 6 from #212392. (FTDNATiP calculates the MRCA of #55945 and #168525 at 82.04% within 13 generations,92.39% within 16 generations, 95.93% within 18 generations, 97.89% within 20 generations, and 99.48% within 24 generations; FTDNA calculates the MRCA of #55945 and#209439 at 82% within 15 generations, 92.04% within 18 generations, 95.62%within 20 generations, and 98.80% within 24 generations; FTDNATiP calculates the MRCA of #55945 and #212392 at 83.43% within 18 generations, 83.43% within 18 generations, 89.90% within 20 generations, 92.23% within 21 generations, and 96.65% within 24 generations.)

Over 67 markers, kit #168525 is GD of 4 from kit#55945, GD of 5 from kit #209439, and GD of 6 from kit #212392.(FTDNATiP calculates the MRCA of #168525 and #55945 at 82.04% within 13 generations, 92.39% within 16 generations, 95.93% within 18 generations, 97.89%within 20 generations, and 99.48% within 24 generations; FTDNATiP calculates the MRCA of#168525 and #209439 at 80.27% within 15 generations, 90.96% within 18 generations, 94.90% within 20 generations, and 98.53% within 24 generations; FTDNATiP calculates the MRCA of #168525 and #212392 at 81.56% within 18 generations, 88.49% within 20 generations, and 95.98% within 24 generations.)

Over 67 markers, kit #209439 is GD of 5 from each of kit #212392, kit #55945, and kit #168525. (FTDNATiP calculates the MRCA of#209439 and #212392 at 74.52% within 13 generations, 84.84% within 15 generations, 91.46% within 17 generations, 95.41% within 19 generations,96.68%within 20 generations, and 99.17% within 24 generations; FTDNATiP calculates the MRCA of #209439 and #55945 at 70.93% within 13 generations, 82% within 15 generations, 92.04% within 18 generations, 95.62% within 20 generations, and 98.80% within 24 generations; FTDNATiP calculates the MRCA of #209439 and#168525 at 75.02% within 14 generations, 80.27% within 15 generations, 90.96% within 18 generations, 94.90% within 20 generations, 96.22% within 21 generations, and 98.53% within 24 generations.)

Over 67 markers, kit #212392 is GD of 5 from kit #209439, and GD of 6 from both kit #55945 and kit #168525. (FTDNATiP calculates the MRCA of #212392 and #209439 at 74.52% within 13 generations, 80.2% within 14 generations, 91.46% within 17 generations, 95.41% within 19 generations,93.17% within 18 generations, 96.98% within 20 generations, and 99.17% within 24 generations; FTDNATiP calculates the MRCA of #212392 and #55945 at 54% within 13 generations, 61.41% within 14 generations, 74.04% within 16 generations, 79.13% within 17 generations, 83.43% within 18 generations,89.90% within 20 generations, 94.08% within 22 generations, and 96.65% within 24 generations; FTDNATiP calculates the MRCA of #212392 and #168525 at 51.46%within 13 generations, 65.67% within 15 generations, 71.74% within 16 generations, 81.56% within 18 generations, 85.35% within 19 generations, 88.49% within 20 generations, and 95.98% within 24 generations.)


MADDEN GROUP B

(kit #738397, kit #740956, kit #753291, kit #738397,  kit #889942, kit #761142,  kit #771345, kit #919920, and kit #918632)

Kit #738397 is the third-great-grandson of his earliest known agnatic ancestor, James Madden, who was born c.1775, and died c. 1820. 

Kit #740956 is second-great-grandson of the James Madden (c.1775-c.1820), above.

Kit # 735291 is also a descendant of James Madden (c.1775-c.1820), above.

Kit #738397 is also a descendant of James Madden (c.1775-c.1820), above.

Kit #889942, is also a descendant of James Madden (c.1775-c.1820), above.

Kit #761142 is the second-great-grandson of Philip Madden, who was born c. 1775, and died in 1848

Kit #771345, whose earliest known agnatic ancestor is Samuel Madden, 

Kit #919920, whose earliest known agnatic ancestor is Nicholas Madden c.1786-c.1850

Kit #918632, whose earliest known agnatic ancestor is John Madden, who was born c.1820 and died 1896.

Also, NB, analyzed over 67 markers, kit #738397 is GD of 6 of a Madden who is not currently a member of this project, and whose earliest known ancestor is John Madden, who was born in Ireland c.1615, and died in Maryland, 1675. FTDNATiP calculates at 92.54% the probability that these two Maddens share an ancestor within the last 15 generations; at 96.20% that they share an ancestor within 17 generations; at 98.13% that they share an ancestor within 19 generations, and at 99.11% that they share a common ancestor within the last 21 generations. 



MADDEN possible GROUP C

(kit #236862 and kit #N28809)

Kit #236862, who has a Niall of the Nine Hostages badge, and who is predicted to be R-M269, matches kit #N28809 (who has tested to 12 markers only) at GD of 0 over 12 markers. 


 MADDEN possible GROUP D

(kit #N61052, kit #475785, and kit #187737)

Kit #N61052 and kit #475785 are GD 1 over 25 markers. 

Kit #N61052 and kit #187737 are GD 4 over 67 markers (kit #187737 and #475785 do not register as matching each over when analyzed over 25 markers).

The earliest known agnatic ancestor of kit #N61052, John Madden, was born ante 1708, and died in 1760 in Winchester Co., V.A.

The earliest known ancestor of kit #475785, Lina (Lema) Madden, died between 1822 and 1830.

Analyzed over 25 markers, FTDNATiP calculates the MRCA of kit #N61052 and kit #475785 at 27.54% within 4 generations; 51.46% within 7 generations; 81.70% within 13 generations; 91.10% within 17 generations; 95.82% within 21 generations, and 97.66% within 24 generations.

Analyzed over 67 markers, FTDNA TiP calculates the MRCA of kit #N61052 and kit #187737 at 58.43% within 9 generations; 80.47% within 12 generations; 92.06% within 16 generations; 95.90% within 17 generations; 99.02% within 21 generations, and 99.69% within 24 generations.


MADDEN possible GROUP E


Kit  #519738, whose earliest known agnatic ancestor is Alexander Madden.

Kit #280999, whose earliest known agnatic ancestor, Robert Madden, was born in 1826.





MADDEN possible members of
GROUP A

Kit #276694, whose earliest known agnatic ancestor was Cecil Madden (1900-1965). This kit may, eventually, be placed in GROUP A. Analyzed over 67 markers, FTDNATiP calculates the MRCA of #276694 and #168525 at 57.06% within 13 generations, 81.51% within 17 generations, 91.42% within 20 generations, and 97.32% within 24 generations; over 67 markers, FTDNATiP calculates the MRCA of #276694 and #209439 at 70.75% within 20 generations, and 86.87% within 24 generations; over 67 markers, FTDNATiP calculates the MRCA of #276694 and #55945 at 54.43% within 13 generations, 83.73% within 18 generations, 90.12% within 20 generations, and 96.75% within 24 generations; over 67 markers, FTDNATiP calculates the MRCA of #276694 and #371117 at 60.35% within 16 generations, 81.76% within 20 generations, and 92.94% within 24 generations; over 67 markers, FTDNATiP calculates the MRCA of #276694 and #536168 at 60.35% witjhin 16 generations, 81.76% within 20 generations, and 92.94% within 24 generations; over 67 markers, FTDNATiP calculates the MRCA of #276694 and #661298 to be 86.37% within 24 generations.

Kit #88123, whose earliest known ancestor is Michael Madden, born 1820. This kit may, eventually, be placed in GROUP A. Analyzed over 67 markers, FTDNATiP calculates the MRCA of #88123 and #168525 at 50.61% within 14 generations, 81.12% within 19 generations, and 94.66% within 24 generations; over 67 markers, FTDNATiP calculates the MRCA of #88123 and #209439 at 63.15% within 16 generations, 83.79% within 20 generations, and 94.03% within 24 generations; over 67 markers, FTDNATiP calculates the MRCA of #88123 and #55945 at 61.55% within 18 generations, at 72.97% within 20 generations, and 88.32% within 24 generations; FTDNATiP calculates the MRCA of #88123 and #371117 at 62.89% within 16 generations, at 83.61% within 20 generations, and at 93.94% within 24 generations; FTDNATiP calculates the MRCA of #88123 and #536168 at 69.16% within 17 generations, at 83.61% within 20 generations, and at 93.94% within 24 generations; FTDNATiP calculates the MRCA of #88123 and #661298 at 61.09% within 18 generations, at 72.55% within 20 generations, and at 88.06% within 24 generations.



MADIGAN GROUP F

(kit #72006, kit #N79414, #208025, and kit #368083)


This group is predicted to be haplogroup I-P37.2(I2a1)

Over 37 markers, kit #72006 acts as a“bridge” in this group. The members are recommended to upgrade to either 67 or111 markers.

Kit #72006, who has tested to 37 markers, matches kit #208025 at GD of 4 over 37 markers, and #N79414 at GD 1 over 25 markers. He is predicted to be I-P37.2. (FTDNATiP calculates the MRCA of #72006 and #208025 at 88.61% within 18 generations, 93% within 20 generations, and 97.55% within 24 generations; FTDNATiP calculates the MRCA of#72006 and # N79414 at 71.76% within 18 generations, 80.07% within 20 generations, and 90.87% within 24 generations.)

The earliest known ancestor of kit#208025 (who matches #72006 at GD 4 over 37 markers) was John Madigan who was born around 1805 in Ireland. This member, who has tested to 67 markers, is confirmed to be P37.2+ and thus haplogroup R-M269 (I2a1). (FTDNATiP calculates the MRCA of#208025 and #72006 at 88.61% within 18 generations, 93% within 20 generations,and 97.55% within 24 generations; FTDNATiP calculates the MRCA of#208025 and #N79414 at 36.11% within 24 generations.)

Kit #N79414, whose earliest known ancestor, Denis Madigan, was born in 1790 in Ireland has tested to 37 markers,and is GD of 1 over 25 markers from both a private “Mr Madigan” and kit #72006. (FTDNATiP calculates the MRCA of #N79414 and #72006 at 71.76% within 18 generations,80.07% within 20 generations, and 90.87% within 24 generations.)

John Madden, the second-great-grandfather of kit #368083, was born 1812 in Tennessee (possibly in Smith Co., TN); he was, by 1850, living in Pope County,Arkansas, where he remained until at least 1862. By 1870, he had moved to Williamson Co., Texas (his neighbour – possibly his brother – being Absalom Madden, born 1818, TN). Analysed over 37 markers, kit #368083 is GD of 2 from #72006; FTDNATiP calculates the probability of shared ancestry within 14 generations to be in excess of 92%; within 16 generations to be in excess of 95%, and within 21 generations to be in excess of 99%. Analysed over 37 markers, kit #368083 is GD of 4 from #208025; FTDNATiP calculates the probability of shared ancestry within 16 generations to be in excess of 80%; within 20 generations to be in excess of 90%, and within 22 generations to be in excess of 95%. Analysed over 37 markers, is GD of 7 from #N79414, and FTDNATiP calculates the probability of shared ancestry within 24 generations to be in excess of 58%. (Kit #368083 is also GD of 2 over 37 markers from a Madigan who is not a member of this project, and with whom FTDNATiP calculates the probability of shared ancestry within 21 generations to be in excess of 99%.) 



UNGROUPED MADDENS


Kit #9293 is confirmed to behaplogroup R-U106 (R1b1a2a1a1a); his most distant known ancestor, Michael Madden, was born in Westport, county Mayo, Ireland. This member is GD of 1 over 12 markers from a“Mr Madden,” who, being private, is anonymous; he also matches at GD of 0 over 12 markers, a Mr Madigan who is not a member of the project. This member is GD of 10 over 37 markers from kit #49471. Kit #9293 is haplotype R1b1a2a1a1a, and L48+.

Kit #49471 is predicted to belong to haplotype R-U106 (R1b1a2a1a1a), and matches #9293 at a GD of 10 over 37 markers.

Kit #108576 has a Niall of the Nine Hostages badge.No information on this member’s earliest known ancestor is available. Kit#108576 has tested to 12 markers, and is GD of 1 over 12 markers from #209439,and GD of 2 over 12 markers from kits #55945, #168525, and#212392.  This member is predicted to be haplogroup R-M269.

The earliest known ancestor of kit #N61052 is his sixth-great-grandfather, John Madden (also recorded as Maddin/Mading), who was born, possibly in Ireland, ante 1708.This John Madden was living in Stafford County, Virginia, in 1724; he was described as of the parish of Hamilton when granted 576 acres near Goose Run in Prince William County in 1730.  In 1731 he was described as “John Maddin ... Tayler [i.e. tailor],” and also as “John Mading[,] Planter.” He died in1760, in Winchester County, Virginia. This member has tested to 67 markers.

This project member represents a family that includes Thomas Madden (1765-1846), who served in the 9th Virginia Regiment Continental Line in the Revolutionary War; Corporal Locklin Lewis Madden (1804-1869), who served in Company D, 56th Regiment, Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and the 1st Battalion, Veteran Reserve Corps, and saw action in the Black Hawk War and the American Civil War; Corporal Robert J. S. (“Bud”) Madden, Jr. (1844/45-post Sept. 1863), who was killed in the American Civil War, while serving in the 37th Texas Cavalry (Terrell’s), Co. E; Obed Madden(1846-1864),who served in the Confederate States Army; Dr Zephaniah Madden, M.D. (1816-1876), physician; Cynthia Ann Bonner née Madden (1835-1884), wife of the Hon. Colonel Thomas Reuben Bonner (1838-1891), who served in the Confederate Army (in Company C of the 18th Texas Infantry), was Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Texas, represented Cherokee, Rusk, and Smith Counties in the Texas state legislature, and was 24th Speaker of the House; and also, through his mother, Lydia Madden (1802-1861), the Hon. Delano Eccles Williamson(1822-1903), Royal Arch Mason, member of the House of Representatives of the Indiana General Assembly for Clay County, and Attorney-General of the state of Indiana; and,though his mother, Polly Ann Madden (1818-1884), the Hon. George Madden Lomax (1849-1917), member of the Louisiana state Legislature.

This member is GD of 1 over 12 markers from a private “Mr Madden.” He has tested to 12 markers, is predicted to be haplogroup R-M269, and is awaiting the results of an upgrade to 67 markers.

Kit #N71477 has tested to 12 markers only. He matches, at this level, a private “Mr Madden” at GD 0. He is also GD of 1 from both kit #55945 and kit #61575. This member is predicted to be haplogroup R-M269, and is a potential member of MADDEN GROUP B above; upgrading to 37 or more markers is likely to confirm whether or not this kit belongs in GROUP B.

The earliest known ancestor of kit#160027 is James Madden who was born in either county Clare or county Limerick,Ireland on or about 1818.  This member (who has a WAMH badge), and is predicted to be haplogroup R-M269, has tested to 67 markers, is GD of 1 over 12 markers from kit #224638.

Kit #206819, whose earliest known agnatic ancestor was born in Ireland, is predicted to be R-M269, and has tested to 67 markers. He matches, at GD of 0 over 12 markers, kit #224487.

kit #224487, whose earliest known ancestor, Jeremiah Madden, was born around 1805 in the parish of Innishannon, county Cork, Ireland. This member is predicted to be R-M269, and matches, at GD of 0 over 12 markers, kit #206819.

kit #224638, predicted to be haplogroup R-M269, the earliest known agnatic ancestor of this project member was Patrick Madden, born about 1795 in the parish of Abbeymahon, county Cork, Ireland; this member is GD of 1 over 12 markers from kit #160027.

Kit #310556, whose earliest known agnatic ancestor, James Malachi Madden, was born in 1793 and died in 1866, has tested to 37 markers,and is predicted to be haplogroup R-M269. 

Kit #368478, whose earliest known agnatic ancestor was Michael Madden (1829-60).

Kit #80029, whose earliest known agnatic ancestor was Tom Madden

Kit #519738, whose earliest known agnatic ancestor was Alexander Madden

Kit #280999, whose earliest known agnatic ancestor was Robert Madden (1826-1900)






XX NON-MADDENS

Kit #24449 

Kit #N51960

Kit #280999

Kit #B70547

Kit #143990

Kit #323714

Kit #298439

Kit #74338

Kit #57206


Author: Dr Leonard Madden