Polynesian DNA

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About us

May 2017
FTDNA updated their Phylotree which split many in the Polynesian DNA project in B4a1a1 and B4a1a1a into various groups.



Apr 2017
The Oceanian category is put back but falls under the broader Central/South Asia category.



Mar. 23, 2017



As of February 18, 2016, Phylotree.org updated to Build 17.  FamilyTreeDNA finally updated their haplotype designation to reflect Build 17 for mitochondrial DNA sequencing tests.   The following changes have occurred with some of the haplogroups of this project, but is not reflected in the FTDNA results.

Build 14Build 16Build 17Notes
B4a1a1 B4a1a1 B4a1a1 Polynesian motif A14022G (A16247G)
B4a1a1a B4a1a1 B4a1a1m & B4a1a1-T16126C Polynesian motif A14022G (A16247G)
B4a1a1a1 B4a1a1a B4a1a1, B4a1a1a18 & B4a1a1a22 A6905G
B4a1a1a2 B4a1a1b B4a1a1b C1473T, T3423a; Malagasy motif
B4a1a1a3 B4a1a1c B4a1a1c C1185T, G4769A; Identified previously as a Maori specific haplogroup

There is a website based out of the University of Otago in New Zealand that was able to gather data and begin to identify through testing where some of the haplogroups are found.



Feb. 16, 2015

FamilyTreeDNA projects convert to the new "myGroups" allowing members to post and ask questions, leave messages for other project members, share information with members, receive discounts from coupons being advertised, and just making it much more interactive.


Jan. 13, 2015

The name of the project was finally changed from Hawaiian Ancestry.  The project's name is Polynesian DNA.  Unfortunately due to technical complications, the actual url of the project will remain as https://www.familytreedna.com/public/hawaiianancestry/

Although initially the project started out with strictly Hawaiians who had either a direct male or direct female lineage (Y-DNA or mtDNA) of Hawaiian or Polynesian descent, it became clear that many Hawaiians were getting close matches with other Polynesians, i.e., Maoris, Samoans, Tongans, and Tahitians specifically with autosomal (Family Finder) results.  This broader category is more appropriate since there is a lot of research done on the Polynesian motif B4a1a1.  Polynesians' loss of heterozygosity, or lack of genetic diversity is often mentioned in the research.  Migration patterns of Polynesians have been studied in the field of linguistics, archeology and genetics.  The genetic studies confirmed that the ancestors of the ancient Polynesians left the Melanesia area, settling in western Polynesia where they thrived and flourished for thousands of years before they continued further migration towards the east to repeat that same process a few times over centuries.

With the name change comes the addition of other Polynesians who joined the project since November.  Polynesians in this project now consist of Hawaiian, Tongan, Samoan, Tahitian, Maori and also Pitcairn background.


Nov. 23, 2014

As of February 19, 2014, Phylotree.org updated and are on Build 16.  FamilyTreeDNA currently uses Build 14 for mitochondrial DNA sequencing tests.   The following changes have occurred with some of the haplogroups of this project, but is not reflected in the FTDNA results.

Build 14Build 16Build 17Notes
B4a1a1 B4a1a1 Polynesian motif A14022G (A16247G)
B4a1a1a B4a1a1 Polynesian motif A14022G (A16247G)
B4a1a1a1 B4a1a1a A6905G
B4a1a1a2 B4a1a1b C1473T, T3423a; Malagasy motif
B4a1a1a3 B4a1a1c C1185T, G4769A; Identified previously as a Maori specific haplogroup

There is a website based out of the University of Otago in New Zealand that was able to gather data and begin to identify through testing where some of the haplogroups are found.

http://www.africatoaotearoa.otago.ac.nz/haplogroups/9-mtdna/6-mtdna-b




~ The National Geographic Society Genographic Project ~

The focus of the Genographic Project is ancient ancestry, not contemporary genealogy, and it does not provide information about "matches" - match information is available at FTDNA. However, FTDNA processes the public kits sold by the Genographic Project. Therefore, if you test with Genographic first, you may add your results to the FTDNA database later at no charge. At that time, be sure to also join an FTDNA project (ours or a surname project) so that you will qualify for group rates if you decide to order more tests. The Genographic Project kit includes a DVD and a nifty map. The price for the basic Y-DNA 12 marker test is the same at both FTDNA and Genographic. The price of the basic mtDNA test is slightly cheaper via the Genographic Project. Participants who add their Genographic results to FTDNA often decide to order test upgrades from FTDNA for an additional fee to obtain more DNA information (they do not need another DNA sample to do this). If you order a Genographic kit - be sure to keep the code that comes with the kit. The results will only be posted at the Genographic web site and you will need that code to see them (and to transfer to FTDNA). If you lose the code - you lose your entire investment. (If you lose your codes at FTDNA, they can help you find them - as long as you keep your email current.)




Project's Origin

Rabbi David Glickman, of Maui, began the project to determine if DNA testing could prove, or disprove, the idea suggested by Native Hawaiian historian David Malo (ca. 1793-1853) that Native Hawaiians might be one of the lost tribes of Israel.

From David Malo's "Hawaiian Antiquities" translated from Hawaiian into English by National B. Emerson: Perhaps these people are those spoken of in the Word of God as "the lost sheep of the House of Israel," because on inspection we clearly see that the people of Asia are just like the inhabitants of these islands, of Tahiti and the lands adjacent.

DNA results to date do not provide any evidence supporting that idea. In late 2006, Georgia Kinney Bopp, of Oahu, the Hawaii Regional Coordinator for the International Society of Genetic Genealogy (ISOGG) offered to assist. In 2014, Kalani Mondoy agreed to be the volunteer administrator of the project.