Palmer yDNA Project- Background

Administrators

Surnames

Palmer, Palmese, Palmieri, Palmigiani, Palmoore, Palmore, Palmour, Parmer, Parmoore, Parramore, Paumere

Background


First arms ever granted to a Palmer. Granted
by Richard I to Hugh de Palmer, the eponymous
progenitor of one of our testers.
Welcome to the Palmer Surname Project (Worldwide)

My name is David Palmer, and my co-administrator is Jim Palmer. My earliest known ancestor was Francis Palmer, chr. 1647 in Metheringham, county Lincoln. Jim's was William Palmer, who arrived in Plymouth Mass in 1621. DNA testing show these two Palmers were probably related in pre-historic times, but not in the more recent past. This may be true for many Palmer families.

Although there were several different reasons for the origin of this surname, the most common derives from pilgrims, mostly from England, to the Holy Land. From the crusades in the 12th century there were many such pilgrims, who made this dangerous journey; on their own in the beginning, and later protected by the Knights Templar. Upon the return of these pilgrims to England, with their palmer purses jingling, and palm branches affixed to their walking staves, they were called "palmers". In this manner there were many unrelated families that took on the surname of Palmer.

Although all of us are related within the human species, we hope that DNA testing can show which Palmer groups are related and which are not, since the advent of surnames sometime around the 12th century. With this in mind, we hope that many Palmer surnamed males will participate in the DNA testing, and share their ancestral history, documented or in oral traditions. It is only by this sharing, "one for all and all for one", that we can extend our understanding of the genetic, genealogic and historic past, as an individual, family, clan, tribe or species.All that having been said, wouldn't it be great if our geneticist friends could identify in the future a gene for pious dromomania, common to all Palmers?

Usually surnames are passed from father to children. Y-chromosomes are only passed from father to son. Because of this, only males surnamed Palmer (or variant spellings) can be included in the Palmer Surname Project after having tests done on the Y-chromosome. If you wish to participate in this project, but do not have the Palmer surname or a Y-chromosome, please consider asking a male surnamed Palmer in your family to be tested. Or, perhaps you could make a contribution in money so that male Palmers could be tested (please see the link under "General Fund" below). Please consider using a test of 25 or more markers, rather than the cheaper 12 marker test. The most common haplogroup for British men is R1b. After being tested, I also found myself in this group, and found more than a 100 matches in the FTDNA database who matched my 12 markers, 12 to 12, though none are surnamed Palmer. I had to upgrade to 37 to climb above these "false positives".


John Palmer, by ship in 1850
from Derbyshire to New Orleans,
to Council Bluffs, by wagon to
Salt Lake City. One of the original
settlers of Brigham City, UT. My
2nd great grandfather. Another
Palmer, another religious journey!
A word on the process: Testing is done by swabing the inside of the cheek, and mailing the sample to FTDNA. After you receive the results by email and snail mail, you may go into "User Preferences" in your personal FTDNA web page and set who may or may not see the results. While we respect your privacy and the choice you make, please consider making the results available as widely as possible. They do not show, and cannot be used for purposes of medicine, health or insurance. You alone will decide who can see your name and contact details. Only your kit number will show, as in the chart in yDNA Results (see top menubar). If you make the results available, you may be the one to provide that missing link to your cousin, or, he may notice your entry and provide that link to you. In this regard, after you get your results can you please go into your FTDNA account, in User Preferences, and input your earliest known ancestor, with a date and location. Likewise, please input a lattitude & a longitude in degrees there for your ancestor, or a balloon will not show on the Google map in yDNA Results (I can help if you wish).

The more information we share amongst us, the better chance for individual and group success! Please visit our Lines of Descent page. It has links to member genealogies, charts showing Time to Most Recent Common Ancestor (TMRCA), and phylogenetic trees. The truth is out there, and we have the tools now to find it! David Palmer, 27 Oct 2007, Hong Kong Member, International Society of Genetic Genealogists (ISOGG) http://www.isogg.org Member, Society of Genealogists (SoG) http://www.sog.org.uk Member, General Society of Mayflower Descendants http://www.themayflowersociety.com
  • [Ancestors: Alden, Bradford, Brewster, Hopkins, Mullins, Rogers & Winslow]
Note: In the interest of sharing, the success of all anthrogenealogy projects, and getting our research topics known to as many as possible, that they might help us in this endeavour, anyone may copy freely from this page. FTDNA's policy on the privacy of tester's information, and for those that join FTDNA surname projects is at, www.familytreedna.com/privacy.html
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General Fund

Current balance: $0.60

Type Amount Date Donor Note KitNum Donation Type
Debit $142.40 8/25/2009   Clerical error, ftdna, first $71.20 should have been debit   Unknown
Credit $71.20 8/25/2009     154482 Unknown
Credit $26.80 8/22/2009 Margie Whitley     Individual
Credit $15.00 8/16/2009 Shirley Liles Hok deep clade test (extend markers on VA ii volunteer)   Individual
Credit $30.00 12/4/2007 Bonnie Chaffin     Unknown