Cook/Cooke/Koch (& Variants) DNA Project - Results

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NEW PAGE:
http://www.worldfamilies.net/surnames/c/cook/results.html

FOR THIS SITE:
The Y-DNA results are found by clicking on the Y-Results button; mitochondrial results (female line) are visible by clicking on the mt-Results button.

Genealogical DNA Tests

Y-Chromosome DNA Tests

Y-DNA 12 Marker Test: Tests the Y chromosome for genetic matches between males. Results are placed in the Y-DNA database and when 2 people show the same identical results, both parties will be notified if they have both signed the FTDNA Release Form. The participant receives a Certificate & report generally describing Y-DNA sequencing and the meaning of the probability between matches.

Y-DNAPlus 25 Marker Test: Tests the Y chromosome for genetic matches between males. Results are placed in the Y-DNA database and when 2 people show the same identical or near identical results, both parties will be notified if you have both signed the FTDNA Release Form. A perfect match of 25 markers means a lesser number of generations before a Most Common Recent Ancestor (MRCA) can be determined. The customer receives a Certificate & report generally describing Y-DNA sequencing and the meaning of probability between matches.

Y-DNA37 - 37 Marker Test: tests the Y chromosome for genetic matches between males. Results are placed in FTDNA's Y-DNA database and when 2 people show the same identical or near identical results, they will inform both parties if you have both signed the FTDNA Release Form. A perfect match of 37 markers means a lesser number of generations before a Most Common Recent Ancestor (MRCA) can be determined. The customer receives a Certificate & report generally describing Y-DNA sequencing and the meaning of probability between matches.

How many markers should I test?: The question asked the most often by people considering the Y-DNA test is ‘How many markers are enough?’

The place to start is to define the term ‘marker.’ A marker is a location on the Y chromosome that may be tested for Genetic Genealogy. These locations, or markers, have names, such as DYS #19 or DYS #385a or DYS #439. When a marker is tested, the result is reduced to a number, which represents the number of repeated patterns of the DNA protein sequence at a specific location on the Y chromosome.

The Lab we use, Family Tree DNA, offers a 12 marker Y-DNA test, a 25 marker Y-DNA test, and a 37 marker Y-DNA test. The difference is that the more markers tested for results, the further the reduction in the time frame to the Most Recent Common Ancestor, or MRCA. For all tests, the number of markers that match can determine whether you and another participant share a common ancestor and how many generations ago that common ancestor might have lived.

If two individual's test results match exactly (12/12) in the 12 marker test, there is a 90%+ probability that they are related. The issue then becomes: when did this common ancestor live? Unfortunately, science cannot pinpoint the exact generation, but science can provide a range of time when the common ancestor might have lived.

If two individuals match in the 12 marker test for either 10 out of 12 (10/12) or 11 out of 12 (11/12), they are also considered related, but the time frame to the common ancestor, MRCA, is more distant than if they had a 12/12 match. Where the matches are less that 10/12, the two individuals are not considered to be related.

If your 12 marker test results match another participant’s exactly, 12/12, your common ancestor occurred between 1 and 62 generations ago, with a 50% probability that the common ancestor lived 14.5 generations ago or less. There is a 90% probability it was within 48 generations and a 95% probability it was within 62.

You can shorten this time span by increasing the 12 marker test to a 25 or 37 marker test.