MacRae Clan DNA Project - News

We are actively pursuing getting testers with proven genealogies to help others find what part of the clan they belong to.

Males pass Y-DNA only to their male children. The results of the Y-DNA testing are found in Y Results and are grouped first by Y-DNA haplogroups, then by matching groups. (For geographic description of Y-DNA Haplogroups see Results.) The locations on the Y-DNA chromosome are called markers and have names such as DYS390, DYS381, etc. The numbers represent repeats of patterns and are called allele repeats. Men who are in the same haplogroup and also have similar numbers of allele repeats are grouped to form family units. Those who have tested at ONLY Y-DNA12 or Y-DNA25 are encouraged to go to Order Tests and Upgrades and upgrade to either Y-DNA37 or Y-DNA67 so they can accurately be placed in their proper grouping.

Females pass mtDNA to all their children, but males cannot pass it to the next generation. Therefore, both males and females can test their mtDNA which comes from their maternal line. In mtDNA Results, the results are grouped in mtDNA Haplogroups (for geographical definitions see Results). HVR1 and HVR2 represent different areas of the mtDNA and the numbers listed indicate the mutation signature in each area. People with the same haplogroup and same sets of mutations in both HVR1 and HVR2 have a common ancestor, but since mtDNA mutations much more slowly then Y-DNA and people are less likely to know their straight female line back many generations, identifying and naming common ancestors is less likely with mtDNA than with Y-DNA.

Hopefully, we will some day find a male who is related to the family of John McCrae, a Canadian, who is remembered world wide for his poem:
Gallipoli - 25 April 1915
 
They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old;
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them.
 
    In Flanders fields the poppies blow
    Between the crosses, row on row,
    That mark our place: and in the sky
    The larks, still bravely singing, fly
    Scarce heard amid the guns below.
 
    We are the Dead. Short days ago
    We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
    Loved and were loved, and now we lie
    In Flanders fields.
 
    Take up our quarrel with the foe:
    To you from failing hands we throw
    The torch; be yours to hold it high.
    If ye break faith with us who die
    We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
    In Flanders fields.
 
    John McCrae (1872–1918)