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Hoolihan

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Houlihan Name Meaning
 Irish: Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó hUallacháin ‘descendant of Uallachán’, a personal name from a diminutive of úallach ‘proud’, ‘arrogant’.

Source: Dictionary of American Family Names ©2013, Oxford University Press

*The surname Hoolihan has been spelled many many different ways over the centuries with countless variations and misspellings. The main causes are translation from Irish to English, Anglicization, Typo, etc. *

From The Tribes and Customs of Hy-many:

Uallachan, son of Flann, son of Flannchadh, son of Innrachtach,

son of Maelduin, son of Donngal, son of Anmchadh, son of Eoghan Buac. From this Uallachan are sprung the Mac Uallachans", i.e. the old chieftains of Sil Anmchadha. From Lorcan, son of Muron, son of Flann, son of Innrachtach, is descended Ua Dubhlaich°. From Forbasach, son of Anmchadha, are descended Nuinter Lorcain°, the Mac is to be distinguished from the Roddys of Fenagh, in the county of Leitrim, who were of a different race, as their pedigree shows.


Mac Uallachans,- This name is now always Anglicised Cuolahan, though in the old records relating to the property of this family, in the reign of James I., it is more correctly made M°Couleghan. In O'Dugan's topographical poem, this family is called O' h-Uallachán, and styled chiefs of Sil Anmchadha; but it appears from other authorities that the Mac is the more usual prefix. The present head of this family is Henry Cuolahan, Esq., of Cogran House, in the parish of Lusmagh, on the east side of the Shannon, in the King's County, which parish originally formed a part of the territory of Sil-Anmchadha, of which this family were chieftains before the 'Maddens. For some further notices of this family see Note I, at the end of this tract.


PEDIGREE OF MAC UALLACHAIN, Now CuOLAHAN.


O°Dugan, in his Topographical Poem, calls this family O'h-Uallachain, and chiefs

of Siol Anmchadha, as in the following quatrain :

"Oippi§ buan-teapoach, blabach,

" A chief ever-famous, renowned,

Or upláp na n-Anmcadach,

Is over the plain of the race of Anmchadh,

pat gaipbjeimleuc na n-flan-af,

A rough-fettering lord of distinguished valour,

O'_h-aipm-neiTineach--Uallachan."

O'-venomous-weaponed,--h-Uallachan."

This looks very extraordinary,

as we know from the Irish Annals that the 'Maddens have been chieftains of this territory at least since the establishment of It may, however, be highly probable that when O'Madden rose to the chieftainship of all Hy-Many that O'Huallachain or Mac Uallachain was chief of Siol- Anmchadha; but this was but seldom the case, as we have already seen in the pedigrees of O'Kelly and O'Madden. It is, however, but fair to give old documents their due weight in historical investigations, and we must therefore receive it as an historical fact supported by the Book of Leacan and the Topographical poem of O°Dugan, who died in 1372, that the Mac Cuolahans were the ancient chiefs of Siol Anmchadha. In the notices of this family, preserved in the Irish Annals, they are not called chiefs of Siol Anmchadha except at the year 1101.-_See Pedigree of O'Madden, No. 21, pp. 143, 144-


The following are the notices of this family preserved in the Irish Annals:

"A. D. 1085.-The Conmaicne made a predatory excursion into Siol Anmchadha,

and slew Coningin Finn Mac Uallachain, and carried off many cows." -Ann. Quat. Mag.

" A. D. 1101,-A conflict took place between two parties of kerns at Clonmac-

namely, Minter Tadhgain [the Foxes of Teffia] and Minter Cinaoith, in

which was slain Gillafinn, the son of Mac Uallachain, King of Siol Anmchadha."

ChroniconScotorum.

" A. D. 1159.

-Aedh [Hugh.] the son of Mac Uallachain, chief of Muinter Cionaetha,

was slain in a battle fought at Ardee, between Muirchertach Mac Loughlin, King of Ailech, and Roderie O'Conor, King of Connaught."-Ann. Quat. Mag.


Since the English Invasion this family have lost thedignity of chieftains, and there-

fore disappeared from history.

No line of their pedigree has been discovered coming down to a later period than their progenitor Uallachan, the fifteenth in descent from Maine Mor, as already given in p. 41, and in the large Genealogical Table.

The earliest notice of this family which the Editor has discovered in the Anglo-

Irish Records, is an inquisition preserved in the Rolls Office, taken at Kilconnell on

the 26th of September, 1617, before Sir Charles Coote, which finds « that Brian

M°. Cooleghan is seized of fee, of Bally m°. Coulighan ; that Hugh N°. Coolighan is

seized of Cogrune ; that Onora Ny-Coolighan, widow, is sized of Carrowanmeanagh, i. Cartron ; that Melaughlin Duff M°. Coulighan and Melaughlin Oge m°. Melaughlin M°. Coulighan are seized of fee of Culnetrump ; that Melaughlin Oge m°. Melaughlin is seized of fee of Clowneleahan ; that Cael m°. Fariagh is seized of fee of Coreclogha; and that Donagh M°. Cooleghan is seized of Adragule." This family have forgotten all recollection of their true descent, the present tradition among them being that they were anciently Irish chieftains, and having been for ages scated at the east side of the Shannon, in a district now belonging to the territory of Delvin, or the barony of Garrycastle, in the King's County, they have assumed it as an historical fact that their ancestors were chieftains of the territory of Delvin, and have accordingly styled themselves under their coat of arms__" The warlike Mac Cuolahans, chieftains of the high and pleasant Delvin, King's County, on the River Brosnagh, and barony of Garrycastle." But it is well known that the Mac Coghlans, and not the Mac Cuolahans, were chieftains of Delvin, in the King's County. The following pedigree of this family has been carefully compiled from their family documents, and kindly transmitted to the Editor by his learned friend, Richard Monck, Esq. of Banagher, who is an enthusiastic, but a yery judicious Irish scholar and antiquary. 

1. Carroll Mac Cuolahan. He is the oldest mentioned in the family deeds, but nothing is known about him, except that he was the father of

2. Donogh Keogh Mac Cuolahan.-He was living in 1602. He was father of

3. Bryan, or Brian Mac Cuolahan, father of

4. Hugh Mac Cuolahan, who was father of

5. Hugh Cuolahan.-This Hugh mortgaged half a quarter of Cogran to Garrett

Moore, Esq., as appears from a receipt or acknowledgment given by Garrett Moore,

son of the former, to Lieutenant Daniel Cuolahan. The words are: "I have received

two papers from Lieutenant Daniel Cuolahan, one relating to half a quarter of Cogran, signed by my father, to leave the said half quarter to Hugh Cuolahan, grandfather to the said Daniel against the plantation intended by Lord Strafford." Hugh died in 1667.

6. Hugh Cuolahon.-He married Isabella Madden, and died in 1686, and was interred 

in the Abbey of Neelick, where he had erected a monument for himself and

descendants so early as the year 1673.

This monument is still in existence: it is a

plain square stone, without armorial bearings or ornament of any Kind, worked into the west wall of the southern transopt of the abbey, with the following inscription in raised letters? "N DID PIERI PRODRUAT PRO BE BY POSTERIS SUNS HUGO CHOLAONAR, ET ISABELLA MADDEN, UXOR BUS, DID XX°, MENSIS MAIN, 1673.» %. Inieutenant Daniel Cuolahan,-He was lieutenant in James Il's service. His brother Morgan was killed by a chnin-shot on the bridge of Athlone, fighting for King James, A. D. 1691. Daniel married, July 8th, 1691, Mary Daly, daughter of Teige Daly of Killemeeny, in the county of Galway, who, in the marriage settlement of his daughter, says: "I will pay to the said Daniel Cuolahan two hundred pounds sterling, in consideration of a marriage portion, as soone as God Almighty pleases to restore me to my estate." ! | He had issue Hugh, who died without issue, and Dr. John.

8. Doctor John Cuolahan,- He was the first of the family who conformed to the

Established Church, which he did in St. Peter's Church, Dublin, on Sunday, the 15th of December, 1754 On the death of his brother Hugh without issue in 1754, he returned from England, where, till then, he resided. He married a Miss Rock, an English lady of respectability, who, by her extravagance, involved the Doctor in debt,

which considerably limited the means of his son and heir, No. 9. Doctor John died in

1761, leaving two sons, Hugh, his heir, and Daniel, grandfather of Mr. Thomas Cuolahan of Ashgrove, near Cogran,

He is son of Hugh, son of Daniel, son of Doctor John.

9. Hugh Cuolahan, Esq.-__He married Miss Jane Armstrong, niece of General

Bigoe Armstrong, Winepole-street, London, with whom he got a good fortune. In his time the property was sold to satisfy a mortgage of eight hundred pounds, passed by his father, Dr. John Cuolahan, to a Mr. Trenchard. It was purchased by Mr. Bernard, late Member for the King's County, whose son is now head landlord over the Cuola-

hans--sic transit gloria mundi.

He had issue John, who died unmarried, and Daniel.

10. Daniel Cuolahan, Esq.-~-Died in January, 1841. He married Miss Frances Antisel of Arbour-hill, in the county of Tipperary, who survives him, and had issue Hugh, who died s. p. in 1828, and Henry, the present Mac Cuolahan, and six daughters.

11. Henry Cuolahan, Esq.-_Present head of the name, born in 1817, and yet un-

married,

Arms,-Argent a lion passant guardant between two bars gules; in chief, three

crosses fitchy of the second, and in base a pheon azure.

Crest.-A dexter arm vested gules, bent at the elbow, hand naked brandishing a

sword proper.

Motto,-__SNADE NA SEAN.

IRISH ARCH. SOC. 9.

On this pedigree the Editor's learned and judicious friend writes the following re-

marks:

" Now let me sum up my opinion of this family. It is evident that they are both

ancient and respectable, but that they have not ranked as chieftains for many centuries. On the east side of the Shannon, where the family have been located for the last four hundred years at least, they have been in possession of some townlands, never, I think, to an extent of more than eight or nine hundred acres; but what with divisions, mortgages, confiscations, discoveries, &c., they are now left without any real estate. Alderman Barker got from Cromwell all the property that belonged to them, but at the Restoration Colonel Moore was put in possession of it, by a decree of the Court of Claims, and he having either a mortgage on Cogran, or holding it in trust for the Cuolahans, restored it to them.

The aforesaid Barker, when matters were somewhat pacified, commenced a suit against the Mores, because they were not sufficiently accurate in defining the lands, and made over about 350 acres to a Mr. Aston of Dublin, measuring off 125 acres, the portion of Cogran granted to Colonel Moore. In fact, were it not for the prudent conformity of Dr. John Cuolahan in 1754, and the marriage of his two sons to the two Miss Armstrongs, which gave them a lift, they might now, like the greater number of the descendants of the old Irish chieftains, be reckoned amongst the tillers of the soil. Henry at present holds about 200 acres, which extend to the Shannon, under a lease of lives renewable for ever,-which is considered a kind of real estate in Ireland, -for which he pays about €61 per annum. He has, besides Cogran, some property in the town of Banagher, acquired in the good Protestant

times, perhaps from 15o to 200 pounds a year, when a life or two shall have dropped. At Cogran there is a picture of one of the Cuolahans, perhaps of Dr. John's father or his brother Hugh. It is well executed, and no doubt a good likeness, at least I am inclined to think so, as I know one of the family, a Mr. Bigoe Coulahan of Ashgrove, of whom it might be considered a likeness at the present day. He was evidently a buck of the day (latter end of Anne) with flowing wig, purple silk velvet coat, gold embroidered waistcoat, &c.

" There is a Doctor Cuolahan at Ballinasloe or Galway, whom I suppose to be of the same family, but I cannot tell you any thing about his pedigree. Perhaps he could trace the pedigree farther back than I have been able to do, from the family documents at Cogran House; but I doubt that he has older documents, and I have also great doubts that you will ever be able to fill up the chasm in the pedigree between Carroll, No. I, in the pedigree I send you, and the progenitor Uallachan, the last in the line preserved in the Book of Lecan; though we hope here that you may get access to manuscripts by the evidence of which you can trace the warlike Mac Cuolahans back to Adam”


Here is what Woulfe had in his 1923 book:

"Ó hUALLACHÁIN—I—O Huolighane, O Holeghane, O Holohan, O'Houlihan, Houlihan, Hoolihan, Holohan, (Holland, Nolan), &c.; 'descendant of Uallachán' (diminutive of uallach, proud); the name of several distinct families, the best known being those of Offaly and Thomond. The name was also very common in West Cork, where it is now often anglicised Holland; also common in Mayo and Roscommon, where it is anglicised Nolan"


The Book Of IRISH FAMILIES Great and Small:

There were at least two separate families who formed the origins of the Houlihan surname in Ireland. The name is found more anciently spelled as O hUallachain, and the family is found in Counties Offaly (Kings) and Clare, denoting two separate 'clans'.

In Offaly, the Houlihans served as chiefs of Clan Colgan alongside the O'Hennessys.

Keatings History gives "O'Huallachain, or O'Hoolaghan", sometimes Anglicized as O'Coulaghan and Mac Conlaghan, to show a few of the many different spellings of the name. They were given by O'Dugan to be chiefs of Siol Anmachadha.

Branches of these Houlihan families have spread southwards independently, so that many of the name are found in Co. Cork.

In the 17th century both Hologhane and Hologhon were found as principal names of Kilkenny, showing two more variants of the name. Other spellings include Oulihan, Hoolahan, Whoolahan and Holoughan to name but a few.

By the 1890's Houlihan was recorded in Kerry, Limerick, Cork, and Clare. "Holohan" was found in Kilkenny at that time.

William Oullahan was a merchant in Dublin, (1781), and from his line, John in 1877 was living in Baltimore, MD.. The firm "Oullahan and Co." miners, in Stockton, California, stems from this line also. Family members were noted in O'Hart as having settled in New York and Washington D.C. As well."

O'Laughlin, Michael C. The Book Of IRISH FAMILIES Great and Small. Kansas City: Irish Genealogical Foundation, 1997. Print. John O'Hart has three Lineages for Ó hUallacháin in his book "Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of the Irish Nation" "Entered according to Act of Congress, by RICHARD OULAHAN in the year 1888, In the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington.



From an unknown newspaper clipping: 

"Hoolahan or Wholihan (in reply to M. Wholihan. Willesden. London) was the surname of many distinct families the best-known of which were those of Offaly and Thomond. When the Thomond family were dispossessed of their territory which extended into Connacht they dispersed and settled in counties Dublin, Galway, Kildare, Kilkenny, Offaly, Meath, Mayo, and Westmeath. They assumed anglicised names such as Colaghan, Coolacan, Hulahan, Halegan, Halligan, Holahan, Hoolahan, Howlan, Olehan, Oulahan, Woolahan, Merry, Proud, Whelton and Wilton. Thomas Nolan O H-Uallachan of Ballinrobe was in 1616 the first to be granted a license to keep taverns and sell wines and spirits in Connacht."


From Surnamedb.com:

Last name: Houlahan

This is a famous Irish surname of great antiquity. It is recorded in at least seventeen spellings including: Houlaghan, Hoolohan, Holohan, Holian, Houlahan, Houlihan, Hanalan, Oolahan, Woolaghan, Whoolehan and even sometimes in County Clare as Holland, in Roscommon as Nolan, and in Kilkenny as Merry! However spelt the origination is the pre 10th century Gaelic O' hUallachain, which translates as the male descendant of Uallachan, a personal name meaning proud and arrogant. Two distinct septs of this name arose in Ireland, one in County Offaly and the other in Thomond, an ancient territory comprising most of County Clare with adjacent parts of Counties Limerick and Tipperary. In due course the septs spread southwards, and several members of the sept today residing in Munster spell their name Houlihan, Holland or Nolan, the latter two forms resulting from confusion over the original Gaelic form of the name in 17th Century records. In the 1659 census the majority of namebearers were recorded in County Kilkenny where Holohan is the most usual present day spelling, although synonymously with Merry. In a pardon of 1558 one, Richard Merry, alias O'Howloughane, was recorded in County Kilkenny. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Donal O'Hoolahan, the Archbishop of Cashel. This was dated 1171, in the "Ecclesiastical Records of County Tipperary", during the reign of King Rory O'Conor, last native High King of Ireland, 1166 - 1175. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.


This name of HOULIHAN was originally derived from a sept which was formerly found in the province of Munster, from the Gaelic H-U Ilachain, who was the Chief of the sept. They were driven into Connaught by Oliver Cromwell. The name has numerous variant spellings and all were derived from the Irish name of the two septs of O hUallachain. One of those septs was located in the north of County Offaly and the other in County Clare. Presumably families name Houlihan in south-west Munster will descend from the latter sept, and those in County Kilkenny (where the spelling Holohan has been preferred) will descend from members of the Offaly sept who migrated southwards. Some of the variants include HOWLEY, HOLAHAN, HOLOHAN, HOOLOGHAN, HOULAGHAN and OULAHAN. In the form WHOOLEY, WHOOLY and WHOLY, the name appears frequently in the birth registrations for west Cork since compulsory registration was introduced in 1864. The tradition of surnames in Ireland developed spontaneously, as the population increased and the former practice, first of single names and then of ephemeral patronymics or agnomina of the nickname type proved insufficiently definitive. At first the surname was formed by prefixing 'Mac' to the fathers Christian name or 'O 'to that of a grandfather or earlier ancestor.Ireland was one of the earliest countries to evolve a system of hereditary surnames. The name was derived from the Gaelic O hUallachain, meaning 'one who was proud and arrogant'. which all were derived from the Irish name of the two septs of O hUallachain. One of those septs was located in the north of County Offaly and the other in County Clare. Presumably families name Houlihan in south-west Munster will descend from the latter sept, and those in County Kilkenny (where the spelling Holohan has been preferred) will descend from members of the Offaly sept who migrated southwards. Most of the European surnames in countries such as England, Scotland and France were formed in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries. The process had started somewhat earlier and had continued in some places into the 19th century, but the norm is that in the tenth and eleventh centuries people did not have surnames, whereas by the fifteenth century most of the population had acquired a second name. The associated coat of arms is recorded in Sir Bernard Burkes General Armory. Ulster King of Arms in 1884.

HOLAHAN (No. 1.)

*Still being extracted*

HOOLAHAN. (No. 2.)

Of Clan Colgan, King's County.

This is the complete genealogy for the Wholihan surname, which is a branch of the Houlahan surname.

Its the complete genealogy starting with the Biblical Adam & Eve, in the Garden of Eden, through to the modern Irish surname Wholihan.

Its taken from Irish pedigrees; or, The origin and stem of the Irish nation (1892), by John O'Hart, - Volume: 1

--------------------------------------------------------------
John O'Hart - Wikipedia page;
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_O%27Hart

Irish pedigrees; or, The origin and stem of the Irish nation (1892), by John O'Hart, 
is available in 2 volumes free on the Internet Archive.

Irish pedigrees; or, The origin and stem of the Irish nation (1892), by John O'Hart, - Volume: 1
https://archive.org/details/irishpedigreesor_01ohar

Irish pedigrees; or, The origin and stem of the Irish nation (1892), by John O'Hart, - Volume: 2
https://archive.org/details/irishpedigreesor02ohar

--------------------------------------------------------------

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John O'Hart, Irish pedigrees, Volume 1, page 44;

THE STEM OF THE IRISH NATION, FROM ADAM DOWN
TO MILESIUS OF SPAIN.
''God the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost, who was from all eternity,
did, in the beginning of Time, of nothing, create Red Earth ; and of Red
Earth framed Adam ; and of a Rib out of the side of Adam fashioned Eve.
After which Creation, Plasmation, and Formation, succeeded Generations,
as follows."— Four Masters.

From the start;
(1) Adam, his son
(2) Seth, his son
(3) Enos, his son
(4) Cainan, his son
(5) Mahalaleel, his son
(6) Jared, his son
(7) Enoch, his son
(8) Methuselah, his son
(9) Lamech, his son
(10) Noah, his son
(11) Japhet, his son
(12) Magog, his son

----
John O'Hart, Irish pedigrees, Volume 1, page 47;

(13) Baoth "to whom Scythia came has his lot," his son
(14) Phoeniusa Farsaidh (Fenius Farsa) King of Scythia, his son

----
John O'Hart, Irish pedigrees, Volume 1, page 48;

(15) Niul, his son

----
John O'Hart, Irish pedigrees, Volume 1, page 49;

(16) Gaodhal (Gathelus), his son
(17) Asruth, his son
(18) Sruth (who fled Egypt to Creta), his son
(19) Heber Scut (returned to Scythia), his son
(20) Beouman, King of Scythia, his son
(21) Ogaman King of Scythia, his son
(22) Tait King of Scythia, his son
(23) Agnon (who fled Scythia by sea with the majority of his people), his son
(24) Lamhfionn (who led his people to Gothia or Getulia, where Carthage was afterwards built), his son

----
John O'Hart, Irish pedigrees, Volume 1, page 50;

(25) Heber Glunfionn King of Gothia, his son
(26) Agnan Fionn King of Gothia, his son
(27) Febric Glas King of Gothia, his son
(28) Nenuall King of Gothia, his son
(29) Nuadhad King of Gothia, his son
(30) Alladh King of Gothia, his son
(31) Arcadh King of Gothia, his son
(32) Deag King of Gothia, his son
(33) Brath King of Gothia (who left Gothia with a large band of his people and settled in Galicia, Spain), his son
(34) Breoghan King of Galicia, Andalusia, Murcia, Castile, and Portugal, his son
(35) Bile King of Galicia, Andalusia, Murcia, Castile, and Portugal, and his son
(36) Galamh (also known as Milesius of Spain) King of Galicia, Andalusia, Murcia, Castile, and Portugal.

----
John O'Hart, Irish pedigrees, Volume 1, page 351;

THE LINE OF HEREMON.
HEREMON was the seventh son of Milesius of Spain (Who is No. 36, p. 50,
the third of the three sons who left any issue. From him were
descended the Kings, Nobility, and Gentry of the Kingdoms of Connaught,
Dalriada, Leinster, Meath, Orgiall, Ossory ; of Scotland, since the fifth
Century ; of Ulster, since the fourth century ; and of England, from the
reign of King Henry II., down to the present time.
The Stem of the "Line of Heremom."
OR,
THE Stem of the Irish Nation from Heremon down to (No. 81) Art
Eanfhear, Monarch of Ireland in the second century, who was the ancestor
O'h-Airt, anglicised O'Hart.

36. Milesius of Spain.

37. Heremon : his son. He and
his eldest brother Heber were,
jointly, the first Milesian Monarchs
Ireland ; they began to reign,
M. 3,500, or. Before Christ, 1699.

----
John O'Hart, Irish pedigrees, Volume 1, page 352;

38. Irial Faidh (" faidh" : Irish, a
prophet): his son; was the 10th
Monarch of Ireland ; d. B.C. 1670.

39. Eithrial : his son ; was the
11th Monarch;

40. Foll-Aich : his son ;

41. Tigernmas: his son; was the
13th Monarch,

----
John O'Hart, Irish pedigrees, Volume 1, page 353;

42. Enboath : his son.

43. Smiomghall : his son :

44. Fiacha Labhrainn : his son ;
was the 18th Monarch;

45. Aongus Olmucach : his son ;
was the 20th Monarch ;

46. Main : his son;

47. Rotheachtach: his son ; was
the 22nd Monarch;

48. Dein : his son ;

49. Siorna "Saoghalach":
his son ; was the 34th Monarch.

----
John O'Hart, Irish pedigrees, Volume 1, page 354;

50. Olioll Aolcheoin : son of
Siorna Saoghalach.

51. Gialchadh : his son ; was the
37th Monarch;

52. Nuadhas Fionnfail : his son ;
was the 39th Monarch;

53. Aedan Glas : his son.

54. Simeon Breac : his son; was
the 44th Monarch ;

55. Muredach Bolgach : his son ;
was the 46th Monarch;

56. Fiacha Tolgrach : son of
Muredach ; was the 55th Monarch.

57. Duach Ladhrach : his son ;
was the 59th Monarch ;

58. Eochaidh Buadhach : his son ;

59. Ugaine Mor : his son. This
Ugaine (or Hugony) the Great was
the 66th Monarch of Ireland.
Ugaine Mor had twenty-two sons 
and three daughters.
All the sons died without
issue except two, viz:
- 1. Laeghaire Lorc, 
ancestor of all the Leinster
Heremonians ; and 
- 2. Cobthach Caolbhreagh,
from whom the Heremonians
of Leath Cuinn, viz., Meath,
Ulster, and Conacht derive their
pedigree.

----
John O'Hart, Irish pedigrees, Volume 1, page 640;

O'CONNOR FALEY. (No. 8.)
Lords of Offaley.

Laeghaire Lorc, an elder brother of Cobthach Caol-bhreagh who is No.60 
on the "Line of Heremon," was the ancestor of O'Connor Faley.

60. Laeghaire Lorc, the 68th
Monarch of Ireland : son of Ugaine
Mor; began to reign, B.C. 593.

61. Olioll Aine : his son.
62. Labhradh Longseach: his
son.

63. Olioll Bracan : his son.
64. Aeneas Ollamh : his son ; the
73rd Monarch.
65. Breassal : his son.

66. Fergus Fortamhail, the 80th
Monarch : his son ; slain B.C. 384.
67. Felim Fortuin : his son.
68. Crimthann Coscrach : his
son ; the 85th Monarch.

69. Mogh-Art : his son.
70. Art : his son.
71. Allod (by some called Olioll) :
his son.

72. Nuadh Falaid : his son.
73. Fearach Foghlas : his son.
74. Olioll Glas : his son.
75. Fiacha Fobrug : his son.

76. Breassal Breac : his son.
Had two sons—
- 1. Lughaidh, 
- 2. Conla, 
between whom he divided
his country, viz.—to his eldest son
Lughaidh [Luy], who was ancestor
of the Kings, nobility, and gentry
of Leinster, he gave all the territories
on the north side of the river
Bearbha (now the "Barrow"), from
Wicklow to Drogheda ; and to his
son Conla, who was ancestor of the
Kings, nobility, and gentry of Ossory,
he gave the south part, from
the said river to the sea.

77. Luy : son of Breassal Breac.
78. Sedna : his son ; built the
royal city of Rath Alinne.
79. Nuadhas Neacht : his son;
the 96th Monarch.

80. Fergus Fairge : his son ; had
a brother named Baoisgne, who was
the father of Cubhall [Coole]; who
was the father of Fionn, commonly
called "Finn MacCoole," the illustrious
general in the third century
of the ancient Irish Militia known
as the Fiana Eirionn, or "Fenians
of Ireland."

81. Ros : son of Fergus Fairge.
82. Fionn File ("file:" Irish, a
poet) : his son.

----
John O'Hart, Irish pedigrees, Volume 1, page 641;

83. Conchobhar Abhraoidhruaidh:
his son ; the 99th Monarch of Ireland.

84. Mogh Corb : his son.
85. Cu-Corb: his son ; King of
Leinster.
86. Niadh [nia] Corb : his son.

87. Cormac Gealtach : his son.
Had a brother named Ceathramhadh.
88. Felim Fiorurglas : his son.

89. Cathair [cahir] Mor.: his son; 
the 109th Monarch of Ireland.
Had a younger brother named
Main Mal, who was the ancestor of
O'Kelly, of Cualan (of Wicklow,
etc.) ; and another, Eithne.

90. Ros Failgeach: son of
Cahir Mor ; a quo Hy-Failgeagh
("failgeach:" Irish, abounding with
rings), meaning the descendants of
this Failgeach, and afterwards the
name of the territory itself which
they possessed, which has been
anglicised Offaley, and which is the
origin of the epithet applied to the
O'Connors of this territory —
namely, the O'Connors "Faley,"
signifying the O'Connors of Offaley.
Ros Failgeach had a brother named
Daire, who was the ancestor of
O'Gorman; and a brother Comthanan,
who was the ancestor of
Duff, of Leinster.

91. Nathi : son of Ros Failgeach.
92. Eoghan : his son.
93. Cathal (or Cathair): his son.

94. Maolumha : his son.
95. Foranan : his son.
96. Congal : his son.

97. Diomusach ("diomusach:"
Irish, proud, haughty, arrogant):
his son ; a quo O'Diomusaigh, anglicised
O'Dempsey, and Dempsey.

----
John O'Hart, Irish pedigrees, Volume 1, page 403;

DEMPSEY. (No. 1.)
Chiefs of Clanmaliere.

DIOMUSACH, who is No. 97 on the "Connor" Faley pedigree; was the
ancestor of 0'Diomasaighe ; anglicised Dempsey, and O'Dempsey.

97. Diomusach: ("diomusach:"
Irish, proud, haughty, arrogant): son
of Congall ; a quo O'Diomasaighe.

98. Flann Da Congall : his son
had an elder brother named Aeneas,
who was ancestor of O'Connor
Faley.

----
John O'Hart, Irish pedigrees, Volume 1, page 404;

99. Cineth (by some called
Tumaltach) : his son ; had a brother
Mugron, who was the ancestor
of Hoolahan, of "Clann Colgan."

----
John O'Hart, Irish pedigrees, Volume 1, page 487;

HOOLAHAN. (No. 2.)
Of Clan Colgan, King's County.

MUGRON, a brother of Cineth who is No. 99 on the "Dempsey" pedigree,
was the ancestor of O'h-Uallachain, of Clan Colgan; anglicised Holahan,
and Hoolahan.

99. Mugron : son of Flann Da Conghal.
100. Colgan: his son.
101. Cumascach : his son.

102. Fogarthach: his son; had a
brother Aongus.

103. Uallachan ( "uallachan:"
Irish, a coxcomb, a fop) : his son ; a
quo O'h-Uallachain, of Clan Colgan.

104. MacTire : his son; first of
this family who assumed this sirname.

105. Connor : his son.
106. Cuileann : his son.
107. MacTire O'h-Uallachain : his
son.



HOOLAHAN. (No. 3.)

Chiefs of Siol Anmchada in Hy-Maine


John O'Hart, Irish pedigrees, Volume 1, page 44;

THE STEM OF THE IRISH NATION, FROM ADAM DOWN
TO MILESIUS OF SPAIN.
''God the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost, who was from all eternity,
did, in the beginning of Time, of nothing, create Red Earth ; and of Red
Earth framed Adam ; and of a Rib out of the side of Adam fashioned Eve.
After which Creation, Plasmation, and Formation, succeeded Generations,
as follows."— Four Masters.

From the start;
(1) Adam, his son
(2) Seth, his son
(3) Enos, his son
(4) Cainan, his son
(5) Mahalaleel, his son
(6) Jared, his son
(7) Enoch, his son
(8) Methuselah, his son
(9) Lamech, his son
(10) Noah, his son
(11) Japhet, his son
(12) Magog, his son

----
John O'Hart, Irish pedigrees, Volume 1, page 47;

(13) Baoth "to whom Scythia came has his lot," his son
(14) Phoeniusa Farsaidh (Fenius Farsa) King of Scythia, his son

----
John O'Hart, Irish pedigrees, Volume 1, page 48;

(15) Niul, his son

----
John O'Hart, Irish pedigrees, Volume 1, page 49;

(16) Gaodhal (Gathelus), his son
(17) Asruth, his son
(18) Sruth (who fled Egypt to Creta), his son
(19) Heber Scut (returned to Scythia), his son
(20) Beouman, King of Scythia, his son
(21) Ogaman King of Scythia, his son
(22) Tait King of Scythia, his son
(23) Agnon (who fled Scythia by sea with the majority of his people), his son
(24) Lamhfionn (who led his people to Gothia or Getulia, where Carthage was afterwards built), his son

----
John O'Hart, Irish pedigrees, Volume 1, page 50;

(25) Heber Glunfionn King of Gothia, his son
(26) Agnan Fionn King of Gothia, his son
(27) Febric Glas King of Gothia, his son
(28) Nenuall King of Gothia, his son
(29) Nuadhad King of Gothia, his son
(30) Alladh King of Gothia, his son
(31) Arcadh King of Gothia, his son
(32) Deag King of Gothia, his son
(33) Brath King of Gothia (who left Gothia with a large band of his people and settled in Galicia, Spain), his son
(34) Breoghan King of Galicia, Andalusia, Murcia, Castile, and Portugal, his son
(35) Bile King of Galicia, Andalusia, Murcia, Castile, and Portugal, and his son
(36) Galamh (also known as Milesius of Spain) King of Galicia, Andalusia, Murcia, Castile, and Portugal.

----
John O'Hart, Irish pedigrees, Volume 1, page 351;

THE LINE OF HEREMON.
HEREMON was the seventh son of Milesius of Spain (Who is No. 36, p. 50,
the third of the three sons who left any issue. From him were
descended the Kings, Nobility, and Gentry of the Kingdoms of Connaught,
Dalriada, Leinster, Meath, Orgiall, Ossory ; of Scotland, since the fifth
Century ; of Ulster, since the fourth century ; and of England, from the
reign of King Henry II., down to the present time.
The Stem of the "Line of Heremom."
OR,
THE Stem of the Irish Nation from Heremon down to (No. 81) Art
Eanfhear, Monarch of Ireland in the second century, who was the ancestor
O'h-Airt, anglicised O'Hart.

36. Milesius of Spain.

37. Heremon : his son. He and
his eldest brother Heber were,
jointly, the first Milesian Monarchs
Ireland ; they began to reign,
M. 3,500, or. Before Christ, 1699.

----
John O'Hart, Irish pedigrees, Volume 1, page 352;

38. Irial Faidh (" faidh" : Irish, a
prophet): his son; was the 10th
Monarch of Ireland ; d. B.C. 1670.

39. Eithrial : his son ; was the
11th Monarch;

40. Foll-Aich : his son ;

41. Tigernmas: his son; was the
13th Monarch,

----
John O'Hart, Irish pedigrees, Volume 1, page 353;

42. Enboath : his son.

43. Smiomghall : his son :

44. Fiacha Labhrainn : his son ;
was the 18th Monarch;

45. Aongus Olmucach : his son ;
was the 20th Monarch ;

46. Main : his son;

47. Rotheachtach: his son ; was
the 22nd Monarch;

48. Dein : his son ;

49. Siorna "Saoghalach":
his son ; was the 34th Monarch.

----
John O'Hart, Irish pedigrees, Volume 1, page 354;

50. Olioll Aolcheoin : son of
Siorna Saoghalach.

51. Gialchadh : his son ; was the
37th Monarch;

52. Nuadhas Fionnfail : his son ;
was the 39th Monarch;

53. Aedan Glas : his son.

54. Simeon Breac : his son; was
the 44th Monarch ;

55. Muredach Bolgach : his son ;
was the 46th Monarch;

56. Fiacha Tolgrach : son of
Muredach ; was the 55th Monarch.

57. Duach Ladhrach : his son ;
was the 59th Monarch ;

58. Eochaidh Buadhach : his son ;

59. Ugaine Mor : his son. This
Ugaine (or Hugony) the Great was
the 66th Monarch of Ireland.

----
John O'Hart, Irish pedigrees, Volume 1, page 355;

60. Colethach Caol-bhreagh : son
of Ugaine Mor ; was the 69th Monarch;

61. Melg Molbhthach: his son;
was the 71st Monarch ;

62. Iaran Gleofathach : his son ;
was the 74th Monarch ;

63. Conla Caomh: his son; was
the 74th Monarch of Ireland;

64. Olioll Cas-fiachlach : his son ;
was the 77th Monarch;

65. Eochaidh Alt-Leathan : his
son; was the 79th Monarch;

66. Aongus (or AEneas) Tuirmeach-
Teamrach : his son ;

67. Enna Aigneach : the legitimate
son of Aongus ; was the 84th Monarch;
68. Assaman Eamhna : his son ;

69. Roighen Ruadh : his son ;

70. Fionnlogh : his son.

71. Fionn: his son;

72. Eochaidh Feidlioch : his son;
was the 93rd Monarch;

----
John O'Hart, Irish pedigrees, Volume 1, page 356;

73. Bress-Nar-Lothar : his son.

74. Lughaidh Sriabh-n Dearg:
his son ; was the 98th Monarch ;

75. Crimthann-Niadh-Nar : his
son; who was the 100th Monarch
of Ireland,

76. Feredach Fionn-Feachtnach :
his son ; was the 102nd Monarch.

----
John O'Hart, Irish pedigrees, Volume 1, page 357;

77. Fiacha Fionn Ola: his son ;
was the lO4th Monarch ;

78. Tuathal Teachtmar : that son; 
was the 106th Monarch of Ireland.

----
John O'Hart, Irish pedigrees, Volume 1, page 358;

79. Fedhlimidh (Felim) Rachtmar: his son ;

80. Conn Ceadcathach (or Conn
of the Hundred Battles*) ; his son ;

----
John O'Hart, Irish pedigrees, Volume 1, page 359;

81. Art Eanfhear, the 112th Monarch of Ireland,

----
John O'Hart, Irish pedigrees, Volume 1, page 664;

O'HART. (No. 1.)
Princes of Tara, and Chiefs in Sligo.

Art Eanfhear, who (see p. 359) is No. 81 on the " Line of Heremon,"
and son of the Monarch Conn of the Hundred Battles, was the ancestor of
this family :

81. Art Eanfhear : his son.

----
John O'Hart, Irish pedigrees, Volume 1, page 665;

82. Cormac Ulfhada : son of Art Eanfhear;

----
John O'Hart, Irish pedigrees, Volume 1, page 667;

83. Cairbre-Lifeachar, the 117th
Monarch of Ireland : son of King
Cormac Mac Art ;

----
John O'Hart, Irish pedigrees, Volume 1, page 668;

84. Eochaidh Dubhlen: the eldest
son of Cairbre Lifeachar ;

----
John O'Hart, Irish pedigrees, Volume 1, page 670;

85. Colla da Chrioch: son of
Eochaidh Dubhlen ; had three sons —
1. Eochadh; 
2. Imchadh; 
3. Fiachra Casan,

----
John O'Hart, Irish pedigrees, Volume 1, page 684;

O'KELLY. (No. 1.)
Princes of Hy-Maine.

IOMCHADH, the second son of Colla-da-Chrioch, who is No. 85 on the
(No, 1) "O'Hart" (Princes of Tara) pedigree,

----
John O'Hart, Irish pedigrees, Volume 1, page 685;

86. Iomchadh : son of Colla-da-Chrioch.
87. Domhnall : his son.
88. Eochaidh : his son.
89. Main Mor : his son.

90. Breasal : son of Main Mor.
91. Dallan : his son.
92. Lughach : his son ; had a
brother Fiachra.

93. Fearach : son of Lughach.
94. Cairbre Crom Ris : his son.
95. Cormac : his son.
96. Eoghan Fionn : his son. Had
a younger brother named Eoghan
[Owen] Buac, who was ancestor of
Madden, Clancy, Tracey, Hannan,
Kenny, Hoolahan, etc.

----
John O'Hart, Irish pedigrees, Volume 1, page 568;

MADDEN. (No. 1.)
Of Hy-Maine, Connaught.

Owen Buac, brother of Owen Fionn who is No. 96 on the (No. 1)
"O'Kelly" (Hy-Maine) pedigree, was the ancestor of O'Madadhain, of
Connaught ; anglicised 0'Madden, and Madden.

96. Owen Buac ("buacach", Irish, beauish): 
son of Cormac.
97. Moroch : his son ; had a
brother named Anmchadh, a quo
Siol-Anmchadha.
98. Dungealach (or Dungal) : son
of Moroch.
99. Maoldun : his son.
100. Cobthach : his son. This
Cobthach had two brothers—
1. Flanchadh, who was ancestor of
Clancy and Glancy (of Hy-Maine),
and of Hoolahan ; 2. Dungal.

----
John O'Hart, Irish pedigrees, Volume 1, page 487;

HOOLAHAN. (No. 3.)
Chiefs of Siol Anmchada in Hy-Maine.

Flanchadh [Flancha], brother of Cobthach who is No. 100 on the
"O'Madden" (of Connaught) pedigree, was the ancestor of O'h-Uallachain;
anglicised O'Hoolahan, Hoolahan, Oulahan, etc.

----
John O'Hart, Irish pedigrees, Volume 1, page 488;

100. Flanchadh : son of Maoldun (or Maoldubhan).
101. Flann : his son.
102. Uallachan ("uallach:" Irish,
proud, haughty, merry), supple, vain):
his son: a quo O'h-Uallachain.

103. Iomrosan : his son.
104. Cartmil : his son.
105. Laidir Ara : his son.

106. Duilleabhar : his son.
107. Luchd : his son.
108. Logach : his son.

109. Lughach Leathdearg : his son.
110. Bromansutal Fionn : his son.
111. Bruithe : his son.

112. Brandabhach Beuldearg : his son.
113. Iodnaoidhe : his son.
114. Fearmuin : his son.

115. Columan : his son.
116. Umhan : his son.
117. Fionnachtach : his son.

118. Brangaile : his son.
119. Ros : his son.
120. Fliuchgaile : his son.

121. Corcrann : his son.
122. Dubhdhar : his son.
123. William O'Huolaghane : his son.

124. William Houlaghan, of Killea:
his son. There is a headstone to
his memory in Carna grave-yard,
south of the Curragh.

125. Simon* Houlahan, of Killea
(Rahilla or Red Hills), county
Kildare, who was son of William,
d. 12th May, 1790,

----
John O'Hart, Irish pedigrees, Volume 1, page 489;

126. John Houlahan, of Killea:
son of Simon ; b. at Killea in 1750,

----
John O'Hart, Irish pedigrees, Volume 1, page 490;

127. John Oulahan : son of John ; 
b. at Friarstown, near Red
Hills, in 1790, and d. in Dublin,
29th May, 1825.

128. Major Richard Oulahan, of
Washington, D.C., United States
of America : son of John 
129. John-Kenyon Oulahan, of
Washington, D.C. : son of Major
Richard Oulahan ; b. in 1851, and
living in 1887.