J-M241 PROJECT - Genetic Genealogy Research Project for Y-DNA Hg J-M241 (J2b2) - Background

Administrators

Background


  J-M241 Haplogroup Research Project

Welcome,

This DNA Project welcomes al men who have been tested J2b2 M241+. The "J-M241 Y-DNA Project" compiles and studies J2b2 M241+ Y-DNA test results for genealogic purposes, we also aim to connect individuals interested in exploring their family history and promote the use of genetic testing to assist genealogical research. The project is open for all J2b2 M241 men who have been tested by FamilyTreeDNA or The National Geographic Project. If you want to participate in this project then you can join this project and order a DNA test all at once by clicking the link below and follow the instructions. Existing FTDNA customers can join this project using the blue JOIN button at the top of their personal FTDNA test results home page. National Geographic Genographic Project participants can add their results to the J2b2 DNA Project by clicking the link on your Genographic page 'Learn more' and following the steps to upload your results into Family Tree DNA's database.

Join the J-M241 Y-DNA Genealogical Project. (for new FTDNA customers)
Join the J-M241 Y-DNA Genealogical Project. (for existing FTDNA customers)

By joining the Y-DNA Haplogroup J-M241 (J2b2) Genealogical Project you have the unique opportunity to participate in the exciting new field of genetic genealogy research wich will give you a better insight into your families history and origins. We encourage all members to join in discussions and compare DNA results.

If you have any questions be sure to contact one of the administrators of this project.



National Geographic’s Genographic Project.


National Geographic, Genographic Project Geno 2.0 J2b2-M241 Heatmap.

Since its launch in 2005, National Geographic’s Genographic Project has worked with indigenous communities and the general public, using advanced DNA analysis to help answer fundamental questions about where humans originated and how we came to populate the Earth. Now, cutting-edge technology is enabling the project to shine a powerful new light on our collective past. By participating in the next phase of this real-time scientific project, you will be able to learn more about yourself than you ever thought possible. You will also help support the Genographic Legacy Fund, which works to conserve and revitalize indigenous cultures around the world.

The Genographic Project is a multiyear research initiative led by National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Dr. Spencer Wells. Dr. Wells and a team of renowned international scientists are using cutting-edge genetic and computational technologies to analyze historical patterns in DNA from participants around the world to better understand our human genetic roots. The three components of the project are: To gather and analyze research data in collaboration with indigenous and traditional peoples around the world, to invite the general public to join this real-time scientific project and to learn about their own deep ancestry by purchasing a Genographic Project Participation Kit, Geno 2.0, to use a portion of the proceeds from Geno 2.0 kit sales to further research and the Genographic Legacy Fund, which in turn supports community-led indigenous conservation and revitalization projects. The Genographic Project is anonymous, nonmedical, and nonprofit, and all results are placed in the public domain following scientific peer publication.

Building on the science from the first phase of the Genographic Project, National Geographic has developed a cutting-edge new test kit, called Geno 2.0, that enables members of the public to participate in the Genographic Project while learning fascinating insights about their own ancestry. The Geno 2.0 test examines a unique collection of nearly 150,000 DNA identifiers, called “markers,” that have been specifically selected to provide unprecedented ancestry-relevant information.

By participating, you will:

• Discover the migration paths your ancient ancestors followed thousands of years ago, with an unprecedented view of your ancestral journey.
• Learn what percentage of your genome is affiliated with specific regions of the world.
• Find out if you have Neanderthal or Denisovan ancestry.
• Have the opportunity to help us fill in the gaps in the human story by sharing your story and connect with other Genographic Project participants

Learn more about the Genographic Project 2.0 Beta


J2b2 +M241 related research papers & publications.

"The majority of the Balkan Hg J Y chromosomes belong to the J-M172 sub-Hg and range from 2% to 20%. Both its main branches, J-M410 and J-M12/M102*, were observed; although the first is scattered in different sub-clades (J-M67, J-M92 and J-DYS445-6) with distinct local patterns, the second is most represented by J-M241."
Y-chromosomal evidence of the cultural diffusion of agriculture in southeast Europe.
http://www.unipv.eu/on-line/Home/AreaStampa/documento2986.html

"Regarding Hg J-M12/M102, which is discernable from India to Europe, the M12/M102* chromosomes display a very high YSTR diversity, whereas on the other hand, the J-M241 sub-lineage has low diversity in the Balkans, indicating different demographic histories. Although Hg J-M241 shows high variance in India, its place of origin is still uncertain. As J-M241 has older expansion times in Sicily, Apulia and Turkey, it may have arrived in the Balkans from elsewhere."
Y-chromosomal evidence of the cultural diffusion of agriculture in southeast Europe.
http://www.unipv.eu/on-line/Home/AreaStampa/documento2986.html

"J2b2a-L283 was discovered by Family Tree DNA through its "Walk Through The Y" program, and is predominantly Middle-Eastern, Mediterranean and European. The M12/M241 frequency peak in the Balkan Peninsula and Italy observed by Semino et al. and Cruciani et al., may instead belong to sub-clade L283. A recent Z631 sub-branch expansion from east to west through the heart of Europe to the UK along with presence in Italy and Spain might be associated with Roman expansion using mercenaries and slaves acquired in the Balkans."
Generation of high-resolution a priori Y-chromosome phylogenies using "next-generation" sequencing data.
http://biorxiv.org/content/biorxiv/early/2013/11/22/000802.1.full.pdf

"The PC analysis, from the perspective of population Hg frequencies, reveals a tight cluster of populations not comprising southern Balkan and Caucasian groups. Common to this cluster are lower frequencies of Hgs, G-M201 and J-M410, and higher frequencies of Hgs, I-M423, E-V13 and J-M241. Whereas the first two are primarily Middle Eastern Hgs and have been shown to be associated with the early Neolithic colonization of Crete, Italy and southern Caucasus, I-M423, E-V13 and J-M241, in spite of parallel Balkan patterns of distribution, have clearly different origins."
Y-chromosomal evidence of the cultural diffusion of agriculture in southeast Europe.
http://www.unipv.eu/on-line/Home/AreaStampa/documento2986.html

"Several authors have proposed that the Indo-European language presently spoken by Armenians arose during the Bronze Age, when Indo-European speaking tribes from the Balkans and Greece invaded Anatolia and Transcaucasia, leading to the subsequent spread of their culture and language. In this study, we have detected a number of lineages that are prominent in the Balkans (I2*, I2b*, J2b1 and J2b2) at low levels throughout Ararat Valley, Gardman and Lake Van, the latter of which also contains haplogroups commonly associated with Bronze Age Greece (ie, J2a8-M319 (4.9%), and E1b1b1-M78 and its sublineages (3.9%)). While this may suggest genetic input from early Greek or Phrygian tribes, it is also possible that these low levels of Balkan lineages arrived in Armenia at a later time, such as during one of the many incursions into the area during the reign of the Macedonian, Roman and Byzantine empires."
Neolithic patrilineal signals indicate that the Armenian plateau was repopulated by agriculturalists.
http://www.nature.com/ejhg/journal/v20/n3/full/ejhg2011192a.html

"J2-M172 is more prevalent in Europe where at least five different lineages can be traced—J2e*-M102, J2e1-M241, J2*-M172, J2f*-M67, and J2f1-M92 (fig. 2, Semino et al. 2004)."
High-Resolution Phylogenetic Analysis of Southeastern Europe Traces Major Episodes of Paternal Gene Flow Among Slavic Populations.
http://mbe.oxfordjournals.org/content/22/10/1964.full

"The sister clade to J2a-M410 is J2b-M12. In India and Pakistan, all J2b members comprise the J2b2-M241 derivative HG."
Polarity and Temporality of High-Resolution Y-Chromosome Distributions in India Identify Both Indigenous and Exogenous Expansions and Reveal Minor Genetic Influence of Central Asian Pastoralists.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1380230/

"Lastly, HG J2b2-M241–related microsatellite variance is higher in Uttar Pradesh near the border of Nepal. It should be noted that numerous Mesolithic sites have been observed in this region (Kennedy 2000)."
Polarity and Temporality of High-Resolution Y-Chromosome Distributions in India Identify Both Indigenous and Exogenous Expansions and Reveal Minor Genetic Influence of Central Asian Pastoralists.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1380230/

"The Neolithic component in the SEE paternal gene pool is most clearly marked by the presence of the J–M241 (more frequent in the Southern Balkans) lineage, and its expansion signals associated with Balkan microsatellite variation correlate with the Neolithic period."
Implications of the role of Southeastern Europe in the origins and diffusion of major Eurasian paternal lineages.
http://arheologija.ff.uni-lj.si/documenta/pdf36/36_6.pdf

"The majority of the Balkan Hg J Y chromosomes belong to the J-M172 sub-Hg and range from 2% to 20%. Both its main branches, J-M410 and J-M12/M102*, were observed; although the first is scattered in different sub-clades (J-M67, J-M92 and J-DYS445-6) with distinct local patterns, the second is most represented by J-M241."
Y-chromosomal evidence of the cultural diffusion of agriculture in southeast Europe.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2947100/

"Both the sub-branches of haplogroup J2-M172 (J2a-M410 and J2b-M102) are found in the two Greek regions. The main branch is J2a-M410, a higher frequency of this haplogroup is observed for Euboea (15.6%) rather than Korinthia (10.9%). The inner structure of J2a-M410 reveals that the main branch for Euboea is J2a-M67, which accounts for the 40% of the total J2a-M410 haplotypes while the majority of the Korinthia haplotypes (75%) falls within the J2a-M67 and J2a-DYS445≤7 branches. The sister clade of J2a-M410, J2b-M102 shows a higher frequency in Euboea (9.4%), with the majority of haplotypes belonging to the J2b-M241 sub-branch (77.8%). On the other hand Korinthia shows a frequency of haplogroup J2b-M241 of 5.5%, with all haplotypes belonging to the J2b-M241 lineage."
The Genetic Signature of Neolithic in Greece.
http://amsdottorato.cib.unibo.it/3628/1/Anagnostou_Paolo_tesi.pdf

"Interesting results from the lineage analysis can be summarized as follows: (i) R-L23*, the eastern branch of haplogroup R-M269, is present in Eastern Bulgaria since the post glacial period; (ii) haplogroup E-V13, which probably originated in Western Asia, has a Mesolithic age in Bulgaria from where it expanded after the spread of farming marked by haplogroup G-P15, J-M410 representatives; (iii) haplogroup J-M241 probably reflects the Neolithic westward expansion of farmers from the earliest sites along the Black Sea."
Y-Chromosome Diversity in Modern Bulgarians: New Clues about Their Ancestry.
http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0056779

"Haplogroup J-M241 shows a network with the central and most frequent haplotype being widespread in the Southern Balkans - a likely consequence of a rapid expansion probably started in Neolithic times in Asia Minor. Since the periphery of the network is mainly occupied by haplotypes found outside this region (Apulians, Indians and Nepalese) the present results do not provide any useful evidence for the identification of the J-M241 homeland. On the other hand, the high age estimates in these populations could be due to recurrent gene flow from different sources. Leaving aside Apulians, Indians and Nepalese, the highest ages, compatible with a Neolithic expansion, are obtained in regions around the Black Sea, namely Anatolia (9.1±2 kya) and Bulgaria, in particular its central part (7.8±3 kya). Consequently, in this region, haplogroup J-M241 can be considered as a genetic signal of the expansion of farmers towards Southeast Europe possibly enhanced by the breaching of the Bosphorus Sill and the flood of the Pontic Lake with marine water."

Y-Chromosome Diversity in Modern Bulgarians: New Clues about Their Ancestry.
http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0056779


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Project Stats

Statistic Type Count
Big Y 1
Combined GEDCOMs Uploaded 7
DISTINCT mtDNA Haplogroups 18
DISTINCT Y-DNA Confirmed Haplogroups 2
DISTINCT Y-DNA Predicted Haplogroups 1
Family Finder 17
Genographic 2.0 Transfers 11
Maternal Ancestor Information 19
mtDNA 12
mtDNA Full Sequence 9
mtDNA Plus 10
mtDNA Subgroups 0
Paternal Ancestor Information 26
Predicted Y-DNA Haplogroups 22
Total Members 33
Unpredicted Y-DNA Haplogroups 0
Unreturned Kits 0
Y-DNA Deep Clade (After 2008) 5
Y-DNA Deep Clade (Prior to 2008) 3
Y-DNA Subgroups 2
Y-DNA111 5
Y-DNA12 28
Y-DNA25 26
Y-DNA37 24
Y-DNA67 13