BEAVER(S) - BIWER DNA - Results

GROUPS:

BEAVER of Kentucky: This group has a close match to participants named Oster & Easter.

BEAVER of North Georgia: This family hails from the mountainous intersection of NC, TN, and GA. Kits 86298 and 99032 are likely related, but one of these participants has only a 12-Marker test, which means a family relationship can not yet be proclaimed. This family may have originated in Burke Co, NC, but definitely somewhere in NC.

BEWER/BEVER of East Prussia (haplogroup N) The Bever of this group is descended from an area of East Prussia which is now Kaliningrad, Russia near Lithuania. The most distant ancestor is Johann Bever who left this area around 1890.

BIEBERS of Alsace and Berks Co, PA: The "Biebers-Alsace/PA" group is another distinct family who immigrated from Alsace, France and settled in Berks Co, PA. This group is represented by Kit N23099, 34709, 65170, and 104458. After immigrating to PA, the ancestors of two participants moved to Licking Co, OH and Rowan Co, NC, respectively. Most Biebers descendants use the Anglicized spelling of Beavers.

BIEVER of Arlon, Belgium (haplogroup R1b1a2a1a1b4): The Biever in this group is descended from the area of Arlon, Belgium. The most distant ancestor is John Biever 1837 of Kleinelter. Haplogroup R1b migrated into Europe from Central Asia then spread until it became the most frequent haplogroup in Europe.

BIEVER of Luxembourg, Luxembourg (haplogroup R1b1a2a1a1a4a): The Biever in this group is descended from the area of Luxembourg, Luxembourg. The most distant ancestor is Michael Biever (1799). Haplogroup R1b migrated into Europe from Central Asia then spread until it became the most frequent haplogroup in Europe.

BIEWER of Michelbach, Germany (haplogroup R1b1a2): The Biewer in this group descends from the area of Michelbach, Germany.  The most distant ancestor is Matthias Biewer (1700) and includes the spelling Biwer.  Haplogroup R1b migrated into Europe from Central Asia then spread until it became the most frequent haplogroup in Europe. 
 
BIEWER of Prum, Germany (haplogroup) R1b1a2):  The Biewer in this group is descended from an area north of Trier, Germany.  It is possible the family name came from the town of Biewer which is now a suburb of Trier.  The most distant ancestor is Nicholas Biewer.  Haplogroup R1b migrated into Europe from Central Asia then spread until it became the most frequent haplogroup in Europe.

BIWER of Borg, Saarland, Germany (haplogroup I1d): The Biwers in this group are descended from the area of Borg, Perl, Germany. The results confirm the most distant ancestor as Johannes Biwer 1743 and include the spellings Biewer, Biever and Bever. Haplogroup I originated in the Middle East or Southern Europe. During the last ice age they took refuge along the Mediterranean. I1 and I2 originated in Northern France as they migrated northward when the ice retreated.

BIWER of Kell, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany (haplogroup I2b1): The Biwers in this group descend from Sauscheid (now Grimburg), Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany. The Biwer family moved to Kell, Germany before 1700. In the 1800s, seventeen Kell Biwer families came to America and settled mainly in Wisconsin. The DNA results for six of these families confirm their most distant ancestor as Adam Biwer (1660) and include the spellings Biwer, Biewer, Biever, Bever & Beaver. The Biwer name is from an area of Germany bordering France and Luxembourg. The group is open to Biwer descendants from other cities such as Trier, Germany. Haplogroup I originated in the Middle East or Southern Europe. During the last ice age they took refuge along the Mediterranean. I1 and I2 originated in Northern France as they migrated northward when the ice retreated.

BIWER of Luxembourg (haplogroup G2a): The Biwers in this group are descended from the town of Biwer, Grevenmacher, Luxembourg. The results confirm the most distant ancestor as Nicholas Biwer 1843. Haplogroup G migrated from the Middle East into Europe and spread along the Mediterranean and eventually inland across Europe.

John "The Immigrant" Beavers; 1694 - 1762: A family relationship exists between Kits N13766, N21825, 19589, 107915, and 109472. This family is connected to John "The Immigrant" Beavers (1695-1762), who came to Hunterdon Co, NJ around 1740 from either Ireland or Germany. Records suggest that John had five sons; Alexander, Thomas, William, Robert & Colonel Joseph Beavers. The DNA profile of John has been confirmed through a match between descendants of Robert and Col. Joseph Beavers.

WILLIAM of Caswell Co, NC: Because of an early 12-Marker match, we initially thought that William of Caswell was related to the "Beaver of North Georgia" clan. However, subsequent testing has shown a separation of these families. Traditional paper trail evidence, combined with a perfect 25-Marker DNA match, clearly shows that Kits 92817 & 31410 are both descendants of William Beaver of Caswell Co, NC, through sons Jeremiah & Johnson, respectively.

William Walter BEAVERS - b. 1755 Forming the "William Walter 1755" group, Kits 97429, 109125, 109126 and N36327 are all clearly connected to William Walter Beavers (1755-1829). The documentation for Kits 97429 & N36327 leave no doubt that they are direct descendants of William Walter. Kits 109125 & 109126 descend from Allen Beavers, Sr. (1776 - 1871), who is thought to be a son of William Walter, but he may be a nephew. Regardless, the DNA is a match. William Walter is thought to have been born in Wales, but this is not certain. He originally settled in North Carolina, but then came to Wilkes Co, Georgia.