Wauchope/Walkup Surname - FamilyTree DNA Project - Results

Y-DNA test results received thus far reveal multiple distinct male lines of Wauchope/Waugh, with likely origins as follows:

1. E-V13 Mediterranean Haplogroup - Thracian auxiliary Roman army soldier or Roman legionary (c. AD 43-410), whose descendants eventually settled in Scotland 

Evidence shows members of this group to be that of the extant Wauchobs of Counties Donegal and Tyrone, Ulster.  Family tradition states three Wauchope brothers arrived to Ireland in 1642 as Cromwellian soldiers in the Scottish army under General Munro.  Their exact connection back to the Borders of Scotland whence they came is not certain, but presumed to be Dumfriesshire (due to a close association with the Grahams of Canonbie).  Results from this group demonstrate a genetic link between the modern spellings Wachob, Walkup, and Wauchope.  Recently Wishop has been added to the list, cementing the connection to Scotland.  Hopefully, a link to a more recent line of Waughs will also be found.


2. I-M253 Nordic Haplogroup - Scandinavian of the Danelaw (c. 9th century) or of the Normans (c. the Norman Conquest of 1066)

Group A. Evidence shows members of this group to be that of the extant Waughs of Dumfriesshire, Scotland.  Results from this group demonstrate a genetic link between the modern spellings Walkup and Waugh.  Results also show a genetic link with a known alternative pronunciation of Waugh from northern England, that being Waff.

Group B. Evidence shows members of this group to be that of the extant Waughs of Roxburghshire, Scotland.  

Note: Members of Group A and B are not closely matched (i.e., not within the genealogical time frame).  Analysis of SNP results has shown the Time to Most Recent Common Ancestor (TMRCA) between the two groups is at least 3900 years.


3. I2a British Isles Haplogroup - Native to Scotland and Ireland after the last glacial age (c. 4,000 BC)

Evidence shows members of this group to be from Scotland.


4. I2b2 Upper Rhine Haplogroup - TBD

5. R-M269 Western Europe Haplogroup - Celtic (rather than Anglo-Saxon or Norwegian) of the Normans (c. the Norman Conquest of 1066) or of the native Britons (c. 6th century BC)

Group A. Evidence shows members of this group to be that of the late Wauchopes of Niddrie-Merschell, Midlothian (formerly Edinburghshire), Scotland.  Results from this group demonstrate a genetic link between the modern spellings Wahab and Wauchope.

Group B. Evidence shows members of this group to be that of the Waughs of a yet unknown location, presumably Scotland.  Results suggest a possible very old genetic link between the modern spellings of Waugh and Bauchop, strengthening the tradition of an early place-name connection.
Group C. Evidence shows members of this group to be that of the Waughs of Edinburghshire, Scotland.

Group D. Evidence shows members of this group to be that of Waughs of a yet unknown location, presumably Scotland.

Group E. Evidence shows members of this group to be that of the Waughs of Cumbria, England.

Note: Members of Groups A through E are not closely matched (i.e., within the genealogical time frame).


Note:  Subgroups of the above Haplogroups are set in part by the project administrator according to the most recent available Y-DNA Genetic Distance results, and as such are subject to periodic revision.

Though Waugh is borne out to be a recently more numerous abbreviation of Wauchope via genetic testing and arising from the place-name, it also has been shown to definitely be a surname in its own right. 

Further testing is indicated. Still left to be answered is whether there is any genetic link between Wauchope and Warcop/Warcup/Warkup, or between Wauchope and Bauchope. 

Although the Y-DNA project answers the who and possibly the where of the origins of the various male Wauchope lines, it tantalizingly does not tell us the following:

  • Were they aware of each other's existence?
  • Were they associated with each other in any way?
  • Were they related via female lines due to adoption or surname change (e.g., A Don of Newton married a Wauchope of Edmonstone and changed his name to Wauchope.  The line's surname later became Don-Wauchope)?

For more surname details see...
www.wauchopes.com