Stark FamilyTree DNA Project - Results

 

Group 1: Descendants of Aaron Stark [1608-1685] of New London County, Connecticut

Aaron Stark arrived in New England between 1630 and 1637 —  most likely from Scotland or England. He was born about 1608 and died in 1685 in New London County, Connecticut. His service in the Pequot War under Captain John Mason in May of 1637, is the first record we have of him in Connecticut. He eventually settled in New London County, Connecticut in a region that later became Groton Township. Many of the early Stark family researchers had claimed the Aaron Stark family was related to later arrivals to America named Dr. Richard Starke, James Stark of Stafford County, Virginia, and Archibald Stark of New Hampshire. Y-DNA comparisons of members of Group 1 to members of Group 2 — descendants of the later arrivals — have revealed Aaron Stark was not related to these three later arrivals to America. When the most common H37 haplotype in Group 1 is compared to the most common H37 Haplotype in Group 2, there is a genetic distance of 17. The odds greatly favor Members of Group 1 and members of Group 2 could not have shared a common male ancestor within thousands of years.

Genealogical research suggests all the members of Group 1 are descendants of Aaron Stark [1608-1685]. Aaron Stark had three sons named Aaron Stark (Junior), John Stark, and William Stark (Senior). John Stark had no sons; therefore, there were no male descendants with the surname Stark to whom he could have passed his Y-DNA. Members of Group 1 have been variously tested over the H12, H25, and H37 haplotypes. If you are interested in a more in-depth analysis of Group 1 go to the web pages entitled Group 1: Y-DNA Analysis of the Descendants of Aaron Stark [1608-1685].



Group 2: Stark/Starke Families; Descendants of Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland {Killermont Stark Families}

About 75 to 100 years after the arrival of Aaron Stark [1608-1685] in Connecticut, three men with the surnames Stark and Starke arrived in New Hampshire and Virginia. Their names were Dr. Richard Starke of Virginia, James Stark of Stafford County, Virginia, and Archibald Stark of New Hampshire (father of General John Stark of Revolutionary War fame). Earlier genealogical research has not been able to determine if these three men were related. However, independent research of each of these men has suggested the ancestral home of each could have been in or near Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland. Many of the early Stark family researchers had claimed the Aaron Stark family and these three men were somehow related. Y-DNA comparisons of members of Group 1 — descendants of Aaron Stark — to members of Group 2, have revealed they have a genetic distance of 17 over the H37 haplotype. The odds greatly favor Members of Group 1 and members of Group 2 could not have shared a common male ancestor within thousands of years, thereby eliminating the possibility Aaron Stark was a near relative of these three later arrivals to America.

Analysis of the Y-DNA of Descendants of Archibald, James, and Richard has proven their descendants are related and proven all three men were related. It now remains for further genealogical research to determine the identity of their common ancestor. Members of Group 2 have been variously tested over the H12, H25, and H37 haplotypes. If you are interested in a more in-depth analysis of Group 2 go to the web pages entitled Group 2: Y-DNA Analysis of Descendants of the Killermont Stark Families.


Group 3: Descendants of Zerubabel Starks [1760-1800] of Robertson County,  Tennessee

Zerubabel Starks was born ca. 1760 and died in 1800. He lived in Virginia and died in Robertson County, Tennessee. His descendants had always thought they were not related to the other Stark families and the Y-DNA results of his descendants clearly confirm this to be a fact. Reuben Starks, reported to be a son of Zerubabel, is a common ancestor, according to the genealogical research, of #82072 and #80570. Jesse Starks has also been reported to have been a son of Zerubabel. Genealogical research suggests #137905 is a descendant of Jesse Starks.  #137905 is a perfect match to #82072 and #80570 over the H25 haplotype, suggesting all three are related to each other and most likely share Zerubabel Starks as a common ancestor. Their results place them in Haplogroup R1b1b2, thought to have originated in Western Europe.

All of the persons reported in Group 3 have been a perfect match to each other at all of the Markers compared. #82072 and #80570 were a perfect match to each other over the H37 haplotype. The resultant probability would be 99.99% they share a common ancestor who lived within the last 20 generations. The genealogy of #82072 and #80570 indicates their most recent common ancestor was Reuben Starks [1791-????]. According to their genealogy, Reuben Starks would have lived 5 generations earlier. There is a 93.29% probability they shared a common ancestor within the last 6 generations. They share Zerubabel as a common ancestor 6 generations back. The probability that #80570 and #82072 Starks shared Zerubabel as a common ancestor within the last 7 Generations is 95.73%. #137905 was only tested over the H25 haplotype and a perfect match with compared to #80570 and #82072. There is a 80.9% probability he shares a common ancestor with #82072 and #80570 who lived within the last 7 generations. If #137905 had been tested over the H37 haplotype and was a perfect match, the probability would be 95.73%.


Group 4. Descendants of Col. John Starke b. 1715 VA - d. Nov 1799 Hanover Co., VA

Those in Group 4 are descendants of Colonel John Starke of Hanover County, Virginia. Their test results place them in Haplogroup G. Between 75 and 100 million males worldwide are in Haplogroup G. In Europe, Haplogroup G is found in 4.88% of the male population on average throughout the continent. In the British Isles, Scandinavia, northern France, northern Germany, the Netherlands and the Baltic countries it is less common, e.g. Britain and Norway at 2%. Around 4% of Welsh men are in Haplogroup G.

#78032 and #N47628 were a perfect match over the H12 haplotype; resulting in a 87.07% probability they share a common ancestor within the last 20 generations.  #89006 and #149455 were a perfect match over the H25 haplotype; resulting in a 99.12% probability they share a common ancestor who lived within 20 generations. The H37 haplotype comparison of #78032 and #149455 reveals they have three mismatches and a genetic distance of 3. There is a 96.97% probability they share a common ancestor who lived within 20 generations. This comparison confirms #89006 is related to #78032 and #N47628; and all members of Group 4 have a common ancestor who lived within 20 generations.

The genealogy of #149455 has been confirmed to John Wyatt Starke [1796-?1860?] but the genealogical connection to Col. John Starke has not been found. There is some evidence Col. John Starke is a descendent of Thomas Starke [b. 1689 in Queen & King Co., VA]  and Wilmouthe Williams. The Jorgenson and Harris publication reports some of his descendants moved to Hanover Co., VA and others moved to Fairfield Co., SC.


Group 5: Haplogroup I

All members having Haplotype I and it's derivatives are reported in Group 5. FTDNA and Ancestry.com use the same H25 haplotype reported in Panel 1 and Panel 2. Five of the markers in Panel 3 tested by FTDNA are not tested by Ancestry.com.  Within Europe, several populations are distinguished by having a significantly lower frequency of Haplogroup I than the surrounding populations: these depressions in the frequency of Haplogroup I distinguish the populations of Italy and Switzerland from Germany and Sardinia, Iberia from southern France and Normandy, Greece, Albania and the Slavic peoples, and the Baltic Latvians from the Finnic Estonians. In all these areas, Haplogroup I populations are small relative to the dominant Haplogroups in Europe (R1b in Western Europe, R1a1 in Eastern Europe, and N in Northeastern Europe).

At this time, none of the members of Group 5 share a common ancestor.


Group 6: Descendants Thomas Starke, born 1724 in Virginia

  #74591 and #89996  are Uncle and Nephew respectively. As expected, they were a perfect match over the H12 haplotype. They are descendants of Thomas Stark [1724-1794] who was born in Virginia in 1724. Before these results were available and members of Group 4 were tested, it was believed Members of Group 4 and 6 had a common ancestor and would be related. However, the genetic results revealed they did not belong to the same Haplogroup. Members of Group 6 are are in Haplogroup R1b1b2. Members of Group 4 are in Haplogroup G. As expected, there was a zero percent probability members of Group 4 and Group 6 could have shared a common ancestor within the last 20 generations. Because Members of Group 4 are in Haplogroup G and Members of Group 6 are in Haplogroup R, their first common ancestor would have been the progenitor of Haplogroup F — who lived about 45,000 years earlier.

When the H25 Haplotype of #74591 is compared to the other Members having the R1b1b2 haplotype, there is a genetic distance of 5 or greater. With a genetic distance of 5, there is a 26.93% probability they share a common ancestor who lived within the last 20 generations; and a 41.56% probability within the last 24 generations.


 Group 7: Descendant of Walter Stark [b. 1670 - d. ???] of Lanark, Scotland

#76345 reports he is a descendant of Walter Stark [1670-???] of Scotland. When compared to other members of the project over the H25 haplotype, #76345 has a genetic distance of seven or greater. The odds greatly favor #76345 could not have shared a common male ancestor with any other member of the project within 5,000 years. The predicted Haplogroup R-P297 is a shorthand presentation of the Haplogroup R1b1b. When the H25 haplotype of #76345 is compared to the H25 haplotype of other Members with a genetic distance of 7, there is a 21.03% probability they share a common ancestor who lived within the last 20 generations; and a 33.83% probability within the last 24 generations.



Group 8: Descendants of Stark German Immigrants to USA

Group 8 is comprised of members whose direct male ancestor was an immigrant to the United States from Germany. The project objectives for this group is to: 1)find genetic matches; 2)possible place immigrated from in Germany; and 3) evaluate the various Haplogroups that may occur. To date, three Haplogroups have been identified. Two members H37 Haplotype comparison suggested a possible common ancestry, but comparisons over all of the Markers were not available. Any combination of Comparisons of members in this group results in genetic distances suggesting their common ancestor lived many thousands of years earlier than the present. Differences in the Primary Haplogroups E, G, and R further suggests a common ancestor who lived greater than 10,000 years earlier. If you are interested in a more in-depth analysis of Group 1 go to the web page entitled Group 8: Y-DNA Analysis; Descendants of German Stark Families.


Group 9: Descendants of Ft. Ann, Washington County, New York Stark Families

 Members of this Group have genealogy suggesting they are descendants of Stark families that lived in Ft. Ann, Washington County, New York. They were expected to have genetic results placing them in Group 1 or Group 2. However, thus far, this Group of participants has not been found to be genetically close to any members of the project. There may be a non-paternal explanation. However, this has now occurred in this specific region of New York State twice. Will be looking for future participants who have ancestors who live in this region to see if this is a trend or if we find matches to any participant in Group 9.


Group 91: Haplogroup F

 #149294 belongs to Haplogroup F. This ancient haplogroup may have first appeared in North Africa, the Levant, or the Arabian Peninsula as much as 50,000 years ago. It is sometimes believed to represent a "second-wave" of expansion out of Africa. When compared to other members of the project over the H37 haplotype, #149294 has a genetic distance of 34 or greater. The odds greatly favor #149294 could not have shared a common male ancestor with any other member of the project within the last 45,000 years.