Munster Irish Y-DNA Project - Results

At the outset, when it is possible, we will be grouping the individuals by the tribe/lineage to which they belong according to the old genealogies, regardless if their haplotypes match or not.  It is recommended that if viewing the Y-DNA Results Colorized, ignore the Min/Max/Mode rows since for most groups, the mode will be meaningless due to different haplotypes being present. 

Points to keep in  mind when viewing the results:


Irish Type II includes any surname with that haplotype who has no other tribal affiliation discovered at this time.

Dál gCais is limited to those surnames related to that tribe.


L226 contains participants with that haplotype who have no other definitive tribal affiliation found.


L362, because of its limited but clear presence in Munster, contains all haplotypes tested or predicted, even though most participants belong to one of the Eoghanacht lineages.


As the project expands, we will reconsider this approach.  Any thoughts, comments are welcome.  The following is a brief summary of prominent Y-DNA clusters present in Munster.


THE ANCESTRAL HAPLOTYPES OF MUNSTER

 

Contents:


Introduction

Irish Type II (CTS446 et al)

Irish Type III (L226)

Munster I (L362)

 

Introduction


In the early days of genetic genealogy, Atlantic Modal Haplotype (AMH) was a label given by geneticists to a commonly occurring Western European pattern of DYS allele counts (values) found at six markers within what is now FTDNA Panel 1.  As testing extended up to 67 markers the extended haplotype comprising the most frequently occurring DYS values found along the Atlantic seaboard became known as Super Western Atlantic Modal Haplotype (SWAMH) and became equated, upon the discovery of SNP R-L21, with the probable haplotype of the progenitor of this SNP, who probably lived about 4,200 years ago.


Tested or predicted SNP R-L21 is seen possibly in over 90% of males whose paper trail ancestry indicates Munster origins. (Our project will refine this figure in due course). We give in Table 1 below the SWAMH modal haplotype, extended to the full 111 markers of FTDNA’s current STR test range, and have assumed, rightly or wrongly, that this is the ancestral haplotype of SNP R-L21 from which various more recent Irish ancestral haplotypes are derived. The values for three well-established Munster-specific haplotypes, Irish Types II and III and that associated with SNP R-L362, are also given immediately to the right of this column.


We will also attempt to identify other ancestral haplotypes found among the carriers of surnames derived from the pre-Norman peoples of Munster, including peoples whose ancestors did not arrive in Munster carrying SNP R-L21, whether through participation of such people in this project or isolating appropriate data from haplogroup projects already advanced (in which case due acknowledgement and links will be given).  Table 1 will therefore grow with the project.


The sections which follow the tabulation address the aforementioned three Munster-specific haplotypes and will discuss each potential further Munster-specific ancestral haplotype in turn as it is identified, the information being supplemented and/or updated on a regular basis as the project progresses.



FTDNA

Sequence No.

DYS / DYF No.

SWAMH (R-L21)

Irish Type II

(CTS4466)

Irish Type III (R-L226)

R-L362

(Note 1)

1

393

13

13

13

13

2

390

24

24

24

23

3

19/394

14

14

14

14

4

391

11

10

11

11

5

385a

11

11

11

11

6

385b

14

15

14

14

7

426

12

12

12

12

8

388

12

12

12

13

9

439

12

11

11

12

10

389-1

13

13

13

13

11

392

13

13

13

13

12

389-2/389-1

16

16

16

15

13

458

17

17

17

17

14

459a

9

9

8

9

15

459b

10

10

9

10

16

455

11

11

11

11

17

454

11

11

11

11

18

447

25

24

25

25

19

437

15

15

15

15

20

448

19

19

19

19

21

449

29

29

29

29

22

464a

15

15

13

15

23

464b

15

15

13

15

24

464c

17

17

15

16

25

464d

17

17

17

17

26

460

11

11

11

10

27

GATA H4

11

11

11

11

28

YCA IIa

19

19

19

19

29

YCA IIb

23

23

23

23

30

456

16

15

15

16

31

607

15

15

15

15

32

576

18

18

18

18

33

570

17

17

17

18

34

CDYa

36

36

36

37

35

CDYb

38

38

38

38

36

442

12

13

12

12

37

438

12

12

12

12

38

531

11

11

11

11

39

578

9

9

9

9

40

395S1a

15

15

15

16

41

395S1b

16

16

16

16

42

590

8

8

8

8

43

537

10

10

10

10

44

641

10

10

10

10

45

472

8

8

8

8

46

406S1

10

10

10

11

47

511

10

10

10

10

48

425

12

12

12

12

49

413a

23

23

23

23

50

413b

23

23

23

23

51

557

16

16

15

17

52

594

10

10

10

10

53

436

12

12

12

12

54

490

12

12

12

12

55

534

15

15

15

15

56

450

8

8

8

8

57

444

12

12

12

12

58

481

22

22

22

22

59

520

20

20

20

20

60

446

13

13

13

13

61

617

12

12

12

13

62

568

11

11

11

11

63

487

13

13

13

13

64

572

11

11

11

11

65

640

11

11

11

11

66

492

12

12

12

12

67

565

12

11

12

12

68

710

35

35

34

36

69

485

15

15

15

15

70

632

9

9

9

9

71

495

16

16

16

16

72

540

12

12

12

12

73

714

25

25

25

25

74

716

26

26

24

26

75

717

19

19

19

19

76

505

12

12

12

12

77

556

11

11

11

11

78

549

13

13

13

12

79

589

12

12

12

12

80

522

11

11

11

11

81

494

9

9

9

9

82

533

13

13

13

13

83

636

12

11

12

12

84

575

10

10

10

10

85

638

11

11

11

11

86

462

11

11

11

11

87

452

30

30

30

30

88

445

12

12

12

12

89

GATA A10

13

13

13

13

90

463

24

24

25

24

91

441

13

13

13

13

92

GGAAT 1B07

10

10

10

10

93

525

10

10

10

10

94

712

20

20

21

20

95

593

15

15

15

15

96

650

19

19

19

18

97

532

13

14

13

13

98

715

24

24

24

24

99

504

17

16

17

16

100

513

12

12

12

13

101

561

15

15

15

15

102

552

24

24

24

25

103

726

12

12

12

12

104

635

23

24

23

23

105

587

18

18

18

18

106

643

10

10

10

10

107

497

14

14

14

14

108

510

17

18

18

17

109

434

9

9

9

9

110

461

12

12

12

12

111

435

11

11

11

11

 

-2

-1

Difference from Modal

+1

+2

                             

Table 1:  Ancestral Haplotypes derived from R-L21

Notes:

 

1.  Values for sequence numbers 68-111 (FTDNA Panel 5) are based on limited information and may be subject to change. This is particularly so for R-L362.  “Hold” means value cannot be determined until more results are available.

Irish Type II (CTS4466)

In 2006, Dr Ken Nordvedt identified two distinctive modal haplotypes largely associated with southern Irish names.  The first, in February, was described as “South Irish” or “South Irish R1b” because of its concentration in the south of the island.  Following the use of “Irish Type I” to describe the earlier discovery of a north-western Irish modal haplotype, it also became known as “Irish Type II”.  Through the 1000 Genomes project and Family Tree's Geno 2.0 and the newer BIG Y, an increasing number of SNPs are being discovered that define this subclade.  The R1b-CTS4466 haplogroup project is studying the subclade and we are beginning to identify the parameters of the subclade and its branches.  See https://www.familytreedna.com/public/R1b-CTS4466Plus/.


Referring to the probable ancestral haplotype, as indicated in Table 1, six characteristic mutations were initially identified in FTDNA Panels 1-3 (1-37 markers). FTDNA Panel 4 (37 to 67 markers) revealed just one more, but now the recent further extension of STR testing to Panel 5 (67 to 111 markers) has revealed at least five new mutations from R-L21, making twelve in all. 

 

It should be noted that the coincidence of four of the six characteristic Irish Type II mutations in Panels 1-3 has been seen in a kit which proved to be negative for R-L21 but positive for its ‘sister’ SNP R-U152.  However, this kit had none of the seven Irish Type II Panel 4 and 5 mutations. This stresses the importance of either testing for SNP R-L21 or at least testing the full range of 111 STR markers to validate Irish Type II membership.

 

The Irish Type II haplotype is shared by over 60% of southern O’Donoghues*, about 50% of O’Sullivans, 30% of O’Mahonys and 23% of McCarthys. These names are strongly associated with the Eoghanacht dynasty in the ancient genealogical tracts.

 

It has been estimated that the common ancestor of Irish Type II lived about 500 A.D **+/- a few centuries.  This is the period when the Eoghanacht dynasty began to consolidate its hegemony over the other tribes of the south.  It coincides roughly with the time of Conall Corc, from whom the Eoghanacht clans are supposed to have descended. However, other considerably different haplotypes are seen in significant percentages of the aforementioned families as well as the many other surnames said to derive from Eoghanacht sources.  It is improbable that all these surnames did indeed descend from the mythic Eoghan Mór, and there is no way to ascertain whether Irish Type II was the haplotype of Conall Corc. And of course, despite the claims of the ancient genealogical tracts, his male lineage may have died out altogether.

 

* The name O’Donoghue has risen independently in several parts of Ireland.  The “southern” groups refer to those of interest to this project and are historically recorded as comprising Eoghanacht Caisil and Eoghanacht Raithlind.

 

** This may have to be advanced a little on consideration of the FTDNA Panel 5 data. 

Irish Type III (L226)


The second southern Irish modal haplotype identified by Dr Nordvedt, in April 2006, appeared to be most common where origins were stated as the counties of north Munster (Clare, Limerick, with appreciative presence also in neighbouring Tipperary and Cork) where surnames associated in the genealogical tracts with Dál gCais peoples are found most prevalent.  This region of north Munster was known as Thomond in ancient times (the south was called Desmond).  

 

Dennis Wright’s excellent website at http://www.irishtype3dna.org/index.php provides detailed information on this cluster and identifies estimates which suggest the common ancestor lived roughly between 700AD-1100AD, possibly near the era in which Brian Boru and his immediate ancestors held sway.  The Dál gCais, historically known as Deisi Tuisceart (Northern Deisi) claimed descent from Cas, brother of the Eóghan Mór who gave his name to the Eoghanacht families, their father being King Ollioll Olum. However, this is considered by many a historian a unification of convenience fabricated by Brian’s tribe and later writers; and since South Irish and Irish Type III are unlikely to have common ancestry more recent than 1,000 B.C. they cannot both be direct descendants of King Olioll Olum.

 

Late in 2009 an SNP, R-L226, was discovered in a L21 Walk Through the Y Test on a representative Irish Type III sample, and this has been found to be positive only in kits clearly displaying the Irish Type III characteristics.  The upstream SNP, Z253, is considered to be of Norman origin by the O'Shea project (see below)


Munster Type I (L362)

 

Cliff McCarthy, one of the early administrators of the McCarthy Surname Study, identified, in 2004 that 9 out of 32 McCarthys (28%) carried the modal haplotype now associated with SNP P314.2.  At this time only 12 marker tests were available, but fortunately these included three distinctive mutations from SWAMH:

 

DYS 390                                 24 to 23 (or even 22)

DYS 388                                 12 to 13

DYS (389-2 - 389-1):              16 to 15

 

By the time of the discovery of SNP P314.2, in a L-21 Walk Through the Y test late in 2009, seven further mutations from SWAMH had been associated with this haplotype in FTDNA Panels 2-4.

 

The surnames and locations of the earliest known ancestors of the first 100 males identified with this ancestral haplotype indicate a significant presence in north-east Ireland and Scotland, north and south Munster, and occasionally in England.  However, it is evident that the main P314.2 lineage with the above ten-mutation ancestral haplotype then splits into two principal groups, with very little evidence of any exceptions. One of the two branches has mutations from 12 to 13 at DYS 617 then 16 to 17 at DYS 557 (a fast moving marker, thus occasionally showing this same mutation elsewhere), but crucially also a further SNP, R-L362, discovered late in 2010, which appears to have occurred after the DYS 617 mutation. This combination has not been seen in any of the presumed northern participants except a Kelly, if he is indeed of northern origin: almost all of these have their own identifying mutation 19 to 18 at DYS 448 and most have 17 to 16 at DYS 458).  In fact, although much more testing for R-L362 is required, this subclade appears to be dominated by McCarthys, who may account for as many as 70% of all with this profile. The other known non-McCarthy occurrences of L362 tested or predicted positive are (O’)Mahony (3), (O’)Sullivan (2), Peck (2), Carey (1), Driscoll (1) and Newman (1).

 

This L362 lineage accounts for about 30% of all McCarthys, this surname’s largest grouping with a common ancestor within the past 2,000 years.

 

 

FIRST CONCLUSIONS

 

The three administrators of this project are an O’Donoghue, a McCarthy and an O Mahony, all bearing southern Irish Eoghanacht surnames.  Each has been researching his or her surname, the haplotypes found within their respective surname projects and their association with other surnames found in Munster.  The understanding of the history of these families is inextricably entwined with that of the entire population of Munster, and this project is devoted objectively to increasing our knowledge of the whole.


Even from the initial membership of the project, it is apparent that the Irish Type II haplotype features strongly within the surnames identified as belonging to the different Eoghanacht tribes referred to in the oldest annals and genealogies of Ireland.

The Irish Type II haplotype can, however, be found in other surnames throughout the province as well.  (We are accumulating a database of haplotypes nearing 1,000 that are potentially Irish Type II.)  Similarly, surnames are found in the Irish Type III haplotype that are not of a Dál gCais lineage and the Northwest Irish/Type I Haplotype has surnames that are not of an Ui Neill lineage.  This degree of disparity cannot be adequately explained by adoptions, NPEs, raids and pillage, name changes, etc.  While we are hesitant, at present, to rely with certainty on any of the various estimates of the time to the common ancestor of these Irish haplotypes, it is clear that the common ancestor of each of these Irish clades lived before surnames developed.  It seems that whatever dominant families maintained the control of the leadership of their tribal territories, some of the relatives made their way independently and eventually adopted different surnames when they came into use.  Likewise, the Eoghanacht surnames contain considerable diversity of haplotype, indicating that not all holders of the surname were genetically related to the chiefly line.

The early peoples who inhabited Munster were described as Clann (children), Corca (race), Dál (tribe), Tuaithe (people) etc.  They were probably tribal confederations of various family units united by proximity of geography.  Even the small number of participants currently in the project with surnames the ancient genealogical tracts associate with these tribes show a variety of haplotypes, which would indicate that the genealogies of these early people are apparently no more accurate than the tracts that describe the Eoghanacht.

It is only logical to assume that whatever size contingent of ‘Gaels’ arrived in Ireland in the last pre-historic waves of invaders, whenever those occurred, there would certainly have been a number of different, albeit sometimes inter-related families.  The annals indicate that the leadership of these Gaels in Munster was centered in the line which became the Eoghanacht.  Which haplotype or haplotypes they bore is impossible to know with any certainty.  But, besides the high occurrence of Irish Type II throughout the Eoghanacht families, there are a few significant anomalies amidst the later families said to be Eoghanacht.

There are three Eoghanacht names which have a low but significant incidence of  Type III – O'Donoghue, O Mahony and O’Callahan.  The Type III O'Donoghues are found in Tipperary and a bit further north-east into Offaly.  They are clearly a different tribe from the Cork/Kerry Eoghanacht O'Donoghues.  While it’s probably just coincidental that a Donohoe is closest to the modal for Type III, there are six of the name who are Type III (three in the Munster Irish DNA (MIDNA) Project) which seems less than coincidental.  It is possible that the Type III peoples were amidst the Gaels and garnered their own territories in Munster, mainly in what became the Dál gCais territories of Clare, Tipperary and Limerick.  The fact that county Cork, the homeland of the Eoghanacht, runs a close fourth in the density of Type III (according to Dennis Wright’s website) may be seen to support that possibility.

The O Mahonys have a slightly larger group of ten Type III (four in the MIDNA Project).  These could be Type III for another reason as well:  Cian, the progenitor of the O Mahonys, married the daughter of Brian Boru.  We may surmise that some of her male cousins would likely have come with her in the entourage she would have had.  In such a scenario they would have become part of the tribe and no doubt procreated.  They could be legitimately considered members of the tribe, though in such a patrilineal society it is not clear if they would have been considered part of the Derbfine from which the chiefs were chosen.

The most notable group in the O’Callahan Project besides a cluster of NW Irish is also Type III.  Curiously, Cellachán of Cashel is claimed to be the regal progenitor of both the O’Callahans and the McCarthys, but the latter have no Type III at all.  However, the O’Callahans do contain a few haplotypes that may be L362 – one of our recognized haplotypes for Munster.  The modal haplotype associated with SNP L362 is the largest group among McCarthys but rare in other names.  While not observed at all so far among O’Donoghues, there is at least one Sullivan (also Eoghanacht Cashel) and possibly a few O Mahonys with that haplotype.  More SNP testing is needed to clarify this further.

We shall be pursuing these lines of investigation as the project progresses.


Additional Comments

O'Shea:

'There has been an ongoing O’Shea Y-DNA project since 2003 with almost 150 participants at present. This, contrary to expectations, shows four separate and distinct subgroups. The main group as expected originated in Kerry (53% of relevant results). There is again, as expected, a group with origins in Tipperary/Kilkenny (18%). However their results are very different from the Kerry group, so different in fact, that the common ancestor of the two groups is estimated to have existed about 1900 years ago, way before surnames came into use. Also tellingly they are seen to have different single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), meaning that any common ancestor is even further back in time. The main Kerry Group is confirmed L21+, L513+, the NW Cork Group is confirmed L21+, Z255+, L159.2- and the Tipperary/Kilkenny Group is confirmed L21+, Z253+, L226-.

A strong case can be made that the Tipperary/Kilkenny group are actually of Norman and not Gaelic extraction. Thus modern science has shown the commonly accepted belief that Kerry O’Sheas were the ancestors of the Tipperary and Kilkenny Shees, to be just legend. Our Y-DNA project’s other two groups are seen to be based in NW Cork (25%) and in Kerry (4%). How these arose is not yet fully understood.'

James O'Shea
Margaret Jordan
Administrators, O'Shea Y-DNA Surname Project

(Note:  These comments do not completely reflect the view of the Munster Irish Project but we respect the O'Shea administrators view as well.)


O'Keefes:

Of all the Eoghanacht lineages represented in the project so far, the Eoghanacht Glennamnach participants (O'Keefes) are almost all Irish Type II.  A recent participant who has joined, however, may be Irish Type III.
We welcome any interchange of ideas with interested parties and will update the website as the project increases and more information is available.


 
Last updated: 16th April 2014