Denmark DNA Project- Background

Administrators

Background

Those with Danish heritage are welcome to join the Denmark DNA Project in one of three ways: 1. If you have not already tested through Family Tree DNA (FTDNA), you may order a kit at a discounted rate by clicking here. 2. If you have already tested through Family Tree DNA, you can join by clicking the blue "Join" button on your personal FTDNA page. When the project listing appears, click the link for "Denmark" under "Dual Geographical Projects", and then click "Join". 3. If you have tested through the National Geographic Genographic Project, you can join the Denmark DNA Project by clicking the link on your Genographic page "Learn more" and following the steps to upload your results into Family Tree DNA's database. Then follow step number 2 above. ADDITIONAL RESOURCES and SCIENTIFIC STUDIES (In English) Mitochondrial DNA The last Viking King: a royal maternity case solved by ancient DNA analysis by J. Dissing, et al. ABSTRACT: "The last of the Danish Viking Kings, Sven Estridsen, died in a.d. 1074 and is entombed in Roskilde Cathedral with other Danish kings and queens. Sven's mother, Estrid, is entombed in a pillar across the chancel. However, while there is no reasonable doubt about the identity of Sven, there have been doubts among historians whether the woman entombed was indeed Estrid. To shed light on this problem, we have extracted and analysed mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from pulp of teeth from each of the two royals. Four overlapping DNA-fragments covering about 400bp of hypervariable region 1 (HVR-1) of the D-loop were PCR amplified, cloned and a number of clones with each segment were sequenced. Also a segment containing the H/non-H specific nucleotide 7028 was sequenced. Consensus sequences were determined and D-loop results were replicated in an independent laboratory. This allowed the assignment of King Sven Estridsen to haplogroup H; Estrid's sequence differed from that of Sven at two positions in HVR-1, 16093T-->C and 16304T-->C, indicating that she belongs to subgroup H5a. Given the maternal inheritance of mtDNA, offspring will have the same mtDNA sequence as their mother with the exception of rare cases where the sequence has been altered by a germ line mutation. Therefore, the observation of two sequence differences makes it highly unlikely that the entombed woman was the mother of Sven. In addition, physical examination of the skeleton and the teeth strongly indicated that this woman was much younger (approximately 35 years) at the time of death than the 70 years history records tell. Although the entombed woman cannot be the Estrid, she may well be one of Sven's two daughters-in-law who were also called Estrid and who both became queens. [2007] Rare mtDNA haplogroups and genetic differences in rich and poor Danish Iron-Age villages from Am J of Physical Anthropology by L. Melchior, et al. ABSTRACT: "The Roman Iron-Age (0-400 AD) in Southern Scandinavia was a formative period, where the society changed from archaic chiefdoms to a true state formation, and the population composition has likely changed in this period due to immigrants from Middle Scandinavia. We have analyzed mtDNA from 22 individuals from two different types of settlements, Bøgebjerggård and Skovgaarde, in Southern Denmark. Bøgebjerggård (ca. 0 AD) represents the lowest level of free, but poor farmers, whereas Skovgaarde 8 km to the east (ca. 200-270 AD) represents the highest level of the society. Reproducible results were obtained for 18 subjects harboring 17 different haplotypes all compatible (in their character states) with the phylogenetic tree drawn from present day populations of Europe. This indicates that the South Scandinavian Roman Iron-Age population was as diverse as Europeans are today. Several of the haplogroups (R0a, U2, I) observed in Bøgebjerggård are rare in present day Scandinavians. Most significantly, R0a, harbored by a male, is a haplogroup frequent in East Africa and Arabia but virtually absent among modern Northern Europeans. We suggest that this subject was a soldier or a slave, or a descendant of a female slave, from Roman Legions stationed a few hundred kilometers to the south. In contrast, the haplotype distribution in the rich Skovgaarde shows similarity to that observed for modern Scandinavians, and the Bøgebjerggård and Skovgaarde population samples differ significantly (P [ap] 0.01). Skovgaarde may represent a new upper-class formed by migrants from Middle Scandinavia bringing with them Scandinavian haplogroups." [2007] Member: The Denmark DNA Project is an independent heritage research project and receives no grant underwriting. Participants are responsible for the costs of their own tests. Donations to the General Fund to sponsor tests are welcome and may be made by clicking the link on the upper left side. (Please note that members will be assisted in joining their appropriate haplogroup project as it is determined...) Information and data obtained from the Denmark DNA Project must be attributed to the project, administrator, and Family Tree DNA as outlined in the Creative Commons License. Please notify administrator when using data for public or private research. Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.5 License. Free Hit Counters
Free Hit Counters

General Fund

Current balance: $0.00